Top of Page
Skip main navigation

Curriculum

The International Studies major is designed for students who wish to pursue an interdisciplinary approach to the global environment and who wish to gain a deeper understanding of a particular region outside of the United States. Courses highlighting the art, culture, history, law, literature, and government of various regions will be offered. Students in this major develop critical thinking, close reading, and analytical writing skills. The International Studies major prepares students for a wide variety of careers in such fields as politics, law, business, journalism, education, public relations, research, and government.

Learning Outcomes

The successful international studies graduate is expected to:

  1. Analyze material relating to world art, culture, history, law, literature and/or government;
  2. Synthesize subject matter from international history, culture, and politics;
  3. Demonstrate competency in a foreign language.

Curriculum Requirements

At least 18 credits must be at the 3000/4000 level.

General Education Requirements (30 credits)

Students are required to complete 30 credit hours as part of the General Education Program.

International Studies Major Requirements (45—57 credits, depending on foreign language)

HIPS 2900 - Research Methods in History and Politics (3 credits)

This course provides an introduction to the research methods that political scientists, historians, and international studies scholars use to answer questions. The course is intended to provide students with analytic tools with which they can critically evaluate research in these fields and train the student to pose and answer research questions of their own. Students complete a semester-long research assignment with an emphasis on using appropriate methodology, employing original sources, developing interpretative skills grounded in creative and responsible scholarship, improving writing skills, using discipline specific citation, and delivering oral presentations. Prerequisites: POLS 1200 or INST 1500 or one HIST course and COMP 2000 or 2020 or COMP 2000H.

HUMN 1200 - Introduction to World Religions (3 credits)

This course provides an introduction to significant forms of religion around the world, including Hinduism, Buddhism, Confucianism, Taoism, Shinto, Judaism, Christianity, and Islam, as well as tribal religious traditions and beliefs. The course will focus on the historical development of these faiths, as well as look at the worldview of each of these traditions, to develop a better understanding and appreciation for the diverse religious traditions of the world.

INST 1500 - Global Issues (3 credits)

This course examines some of the increasingly complex and diverse issues confronting humanity. It examines the great diversity of opinion that people hold on important global issues, such as population, natural resource utilization, development, human rights, and values. Students may not receive credit for both INST 1500 and GLBS 1500. 

INST 2000 - International Political Economy (3 credits)

This course is an examination of the intersection of the political and economic worlds. Although these worlds are often presented as self-contained spheres, the reality is that politics and economics are inherently intertwined. This course focuses on the post-World War II era and the processes often described as “globalization.” We begin by introducing the competing theoretical perspectives that scholars and policymakers use to understand and explain international political economy. We will also identify and examine the roles that the three main actors (states, markets, and corporations) play in our increasingly globalized world and how their roles have shifted and changed since 1945. Throughout the course we will focus on several larger themes concerning international political economy, including the following: What exactly do we mean by “globalization”? What role have states and corporations played in facilitating globalization? What institutions have been created to implement and manage globalization? And perhaps most important: Who have been the winners and losers under globalization?

Select 3 credits from the following courses:

HIST 1150 - Early World History (3 credits)

A study of the development of world civilizations, examining the interrelationships of the various regions of the world from Prehistoric times through 1500, including the rise of world communities, cultures, religions, and empires, tracing the development of trade, economics, political forms, the creation of the nation-state, and on the development of technology and the use of war of resolve cultural/religious/national conflicts.

HIST 1160 - Modern World History (3 credits)

A study of the interrelationships of world civilizations of the various regions of the world in the post-Renaissance era, examining the major world communities, cultures, and religions, tracing the modernization of economics and political systems, and the relations between modern nation-states. The course will also examine the collapse of colonialism, the beginning and end of the Cold War, the use of technology and warfare to resolve cultural/religious/ national conflicts, and the role played by the United States in world affairs in the modern era.

Select 3 credits from the following courses:

LITR 2030 - World Literature I (3 credits)

A survey of selected masterpieces by international writers from antiquity through the Renaissance, emphasizing the evolution of world culture. Prerequisite: COMP 1500 or COMP 1500H. 

LITR 2031 - World Literature II (3 credits)

A survey of selected masterpieces by international writers from the 17th century through the 20th century, emphasizing the evolution of world culture. Prerequisite: COMP 1500 or COMP 1500H. 

Subject Areas (18 credits)

Select two tracks, taking 9 credits from each track:

Select 9 credits from the following courses:

ANTH 2300 - Cultural Anthropology (3 credits)

The course compares and contrast cultures, the ways people live, through an anthropological lens. It will include examination of how humans create and transmit culture and cultural artifacts. Analysis of how humans view cultures other than their own and the ways in which this impacts the study of anthropology will also be addressed. Prerequisite: ANTH 1020.

HUMN 2300 - Introduction to World Mythology (3 credits)

This course provides a broad overview of myths from various geographic areas and historical periods, including Egyptian, Mesopotamian, Greek, Roman, Celtic, Germanic, Asian, North and South American, African and Australian traditions. The course emphasizes the importance of myth in world cultures. Prerequisite: COMP 1500 or COMP 1500H.

HUMN 2350 - Introduction to Folklore (3 credits)

This course explores various definitions of folklore, focusing on the ways that literature, art, music, performance, and religion all contribute to a culture. Students will be exposed to multiple storytelling techniques and how the many disciplines included in the study of folklore can be understood as forms of narration that tell the story of a culture's evolution. Folklore of different ethnographic backgrounds will be covered, including modern American folklore. Prerequisite: COMP 1500 or COMP 1500H.

HUMN 2400 - Introduction to Celtic Studies (3 credits)

This course provides an introduction to the languages, literatures, history, art, mythology and cultures of the Celtic peoples of Europe, from ancient Gaul, Britain and Ireland to the 21st century. Prerequisites: COMP 1500 or COMP 1500H.

HUMN 3800 - Mexican Cult of Death in Myth and Literature (3 credits)

This course examines the Mexican Cult of Death as an ubiquitous theme in Mexican arts and letters. Prerequisites: One ARTS, FILM, HIST, HUMN, LITR, or PHIL course; and COMP 2000, 2010, or 2020 or COMP 2000H.

HUMN 4200 - Asian Thought (3 credits)

An introduction to the fundamental teachings of significant religious and philosophical systems of Asia, offering a broad overview of such topics as Wu Wei, karma, reincarnation, impermanence, the nature of the mind, the paths of enlightenment, and basic practices such as meditation and compassionate action. Prerequisites: one ARTS, FILM, HIST, HUMN, LITR, PHIL or THEA course; and COMP 2000, COMP 2010, or COMP 2020.

LITR 3510 - Irish Literature (3 credits)

A study of Irish and Celtic literatures, focusing on early Irish myth and medieval literature translated from Gaelic, the literature of the Irish Renaissance in the early 20th century, and contemporary Irish poetry and prose. Prerequisites: one LITR course; and COMP 2000, COMP 2010, or COMP 2020 or COMP 2000H.

LITR 3530 - Caribbean Literature (3 credits)

A study of Irish and Celtic literatures, focusing on early Irish myth and medieval literature translated from Gaelic, the literature of the Irish Renaissance in the early 20th century, and contemporary Irish poetry and prose. Prerequisites: one LITR course; and COMP 2000, COMP 2010, or COMP 2020 or COMP 2000H.

LITR 3540 - Latin American Literature (3 credits)

A survey of Latin American literature in translation. Prerequisite: one LITR course; and COMP 2000, COMP 2010, or COMP 2020 or COMP 2000H.

MUSC 3600 - Music of World Cultures (3 credits)

This course will introduce musical traditions from around the world and examine how cultural setting shapes the music. The meanings derived from musical styles and structures will be assessed through active and informed listening. Non-Western cultures studied may include West Africa, Asia, India, Latin America, and more. Prerequisite: COMP 2000, COMP 2000H, COMP 2010, or COMP 2020. 

SPAN 3240 - Introduction to Spanish Literature (3 credits)

An introductory literature course intended to familiarize students with the literature of Spain from the medieval period until the twentieth century and to develop skills in literary analysis. Class discussions, readings, oral and written work all in Spanish. Prerequisite: SPAN 2350 or SPAN 3000 or a Spanish Challenge Exam score of 93 or higher.

SPAN 3250 - Introduction to Latin American Literature (3 credits)

An introductory literature course intended to familiarize students with the literature of Latin America through selected readings in all genres and to develop skills in literary analysis. Class discussions, readings, oral and written work all in Spanish. Prerequisite: SPAN 2350 or SPAN 3000 or a Spanish Challenge Exam score of 93 or higher.

SPAN 4900 - Special Topics in Spanish (3 credits)

An in-depth study of a period, an author or a literary genre in the Spanish language. Class discussions, readings, oral and written work all in Spanish. May be repeated once for credit, if content changes, and with written consent of division director. Prerequisite: one 3000-level SPAN course. 

Select 9 credits from the following courses:

HIST 2130 - Formation of Latin America (3 credits)

An interdisciplinary study of ancient American and Latin American systems and societies. The course examines ways in which essential elements of indigenous cultures have had an impact on the development of Latin American political, social, and economic institutions; the impact of Iberian history and socioeconomic systems on the discovery, colonization, and development of American nations; the legacy of Spanish and Portuguese colonialism to emerging Latin American states; and the major goals and consequences of 19th century neocolonialism. Prerequisite: COMP 1500 or COMP 1500H.

HIST 2140 - Modern Latin America (3 credits)

Using Latin America and the Caribbean as a focal point, the course provides an interdisciplinary overview of contemporary American systems and societies and their place in a rapidly changing, increasingly interdependent world. Topics discussed will include the causes and goals of revolution in Latin America, Latin American debt and development, U.S.-Latin American relations, and a new hemispheric order for the 21st century. Prerequisite: COMP 1500 or COMP 1500H. 

HIST 2300 - Caribbean History (3 credits)

This course traces the history of the Caribbean from the fifteenth century to the present, examining such issues as indigenous peoples and the early years of European settlement and colonization, the construction of African slavery, the changing place of the Caribbean in the world economy, various aspects of slave society, and the abolition of slavery. Revolution and struggles for independence will be emphasized, as will be U.S. imperialism, migration, and the rise of intellectual, artistic and literary movements in Caribbean island nations. Prerequisite: COMP 1500 or COMP 1500H.

HIST 2400 - African History (3 credits)

This class will focus on Africa as a vast continent that is characterized by enormous ethnic, religious, geographic, and historical diversity. Emphasis will be on the transatlantic slave trade and its impact on Africa and Africa's relations with the outside world. European colonization of Africa and the extent to which it shaped the modern history of the continent; and the history of South Africa and the rise and fall of the Apartheid Regime. Prerequisite: COMP 1500 or COMP 1500H. 

HIST 3240 - Irish History (3 credits)

This course will study Irish history from the Neolithic era to the 21st century, focusing on the colonial relation between Britain and Ireland, including the 17th-century Plantation, the Cromwellian and Williamite wars, the United Irishmen and the 1798 Rising, the Act of Union, the Great Hunger (Famine) and emigration to America, and the formation of the Irish Republic and the Northern Irish state in 1922. Prerequisites: one HIST course; and COMP 2000 or COMP 2010 or COMP 2020 or COMP 2000H.

HIST 3430 - Renaissance and Reformation Europe (3 credits)

This course examines the reemergence of Europe in the fourteenth century as a center for political, intellectual, economic, and artistic developments. It also explores the religious, political, and social upheavals of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries by focusing on the split between Protestants and Catholics, the development of powerful nation states, and the newly emerging "scientific" theories of the era. Prerequisites: one HIST course and COMP 2000 or COMP 2020 or COMP 2000H. 

HIST 3450 - History of American Immigration (3 credits)

This course will examine the history of American immigration. The course will study the motivation for those coming to America, immigration demographics, the impact of immigration on American society, American reaction to immigration in public opinion, and the political, social, and legal response to immigration. Prerequisite: one HIST course; COMP 2000, 2010, or 2020 or COMP 2000H.

HUMN 4400 - Issues in Latin American Development and Sustainability (3 credits)

In this course, theory and history are combined in an attempt to understand the various forces that have shaped development in Latin America, past, present and future. We start by examining divergent theories of development and their applications to the region. The historical roots of modern institutions are explored. The course then turns to the modern political and economic challenges confronting the region. The role of the state, the market, and the informal sector in the development process will be debated, as well as the prospects of reform and sustainable development in the future. Prerequisites: COMP 2000 or 2020 and INST 1500 or HIST 2130 or HIST 2140. 

POLS 2010 - Comparative Government (3 credits)

This course will examine the elements of foreign political systems such as constitutions, political parties, institutions, historical development, and ideology using the United States as a frame of reference. Attention will be given to how legislation is enacted, how elections are conducted, and the relationship between the judicial, executive, and legislative branches of government. 

POLS 2300 - International Relations (3 credits)

This course will introduce students to various theories and concepts used by scholars in the field of international relations and demonstrate their practical application to understanding major issues in contemporary international politics such as war, globalization, international trade and finance, the role of international organizations, ethnic conflict and peacekeeping, proliferation of nuclear weapons, migration and poverty, and the role of international organizations and NGOs. Prerequisite: COMP 1500 or COMP 1500H. 

POLS 3500 - Global Politics (3 credits)

This course offers an issue-based examination of world politics. Drawing on theories and practices in the field of international relations, the course will examine pressing and important problems in the world today such as global warming, terrorism, failed states, international public health, transnational organizations, human rights, drug trafficking and global crime. Each issue will be framed in appropriate theoretical, historical and contemporary perspectives, and problem solving exercises will be utilized in order to arrive at a fuller understanding of the dynamics of world politics. Prerequisites: POLS 2300 and COMP 2000 or 2020 or COMP 2000H.

POLS 4100 - European Union (3 credits)

This course will examine the historical development, the political parties, and the institutions (Commission, Parliament, Council of Ministers) of the European Union. Attention will be given to how European Union policies are developed, enacted and enforced as well as the effect of European rules upon the domestic legal systems of the twenty-seven member states. Students will consider to what extent the European Union will continue its development in terms of both increased horizontal and vertical integration. Students will also appraise to what extent the European Union protects the human rights and economic interests of its citizens and how effectively it functions as a unit in the international arena. Prerequisites: POLS 1200 and COMP 2000 or 2020 or COMP 2000H. 

POLS 4200 - Latin American Politics (3 credits)

This course will examine the politics of Latin America. Emphasis will be placed on the political, economic, and social developments that have contributed to Latin America?s current state of development. The course will also examine the political development of Latin American states, the impact of the Cold War, internal political conflict and the role of the military in these conflicts, and democratization and social movements. Some of the aspects that will be highlighted are the effect of colonization on the region's economic development, the impact of revolution, and the effects of migration. Prerequisite: POLS 1200 and COMP 2000 or 2020 or COMP 2000H.

POLS 4300 - Middle Eastern Politics (3 credits)

This course will examine the politics of the Middle East. Emphasis will be placed on the political, economic and social developments that have contributed to current tensions in the Middle East. The course will also examine the political development of Middle Eastern states, the phenomenon of Arab nationalism, Islamism, the Palestinian-Israeli conflict, democratization, oil and economic development and regional security. Some of the aspects that will be highlighted are an understanding of the Arab-Israeli conflict, events surrounding Iraq, and changing patterns in other countries such as Iran, Syria, Lebanon and Egypt. Prerequisite: POLS 1200 and COMP 2000 or 2020 or COMP 2000H. 

Select 9 credits from the following courses:

COMM 2300 - Intercultural Communication (3 credits)

The purpose of this course is to develop an understanding of communication across cultural boundaries and the role of diversity in interpersonal, public, and mass communication. Students will study communication differences across cultures and the importance of being rhetorically sensitive when communicating with diverse audiences. Prerequisite: COMP 1500 or COMP 1500H. 

HIST 3140 - The Holocaust (3 credits)

A study of the history of the Holocaust. This course will look at the causes, reasons, results, and implications of the Holocaust from both a European and American perspective. Prerequisites: one HIST course; and COMP 2000, COMP 2010, or COMP 2020.

HIST 3130 - Vietnam (3 credits)

This course takes an interdisciplinary approach to examine the origins and causes of the Vietnam War, explore the ways it was fought, and evaluate its impact on American society, politics, and life. Specific focus will be on the way that the Vietnam conflict inspired feelings of strife and anger, confusion and frustration to an entire generation of Americans as America's first "lost" war. Prerequisites: one HIST course; and COMP 2000, COMP 2010, or COMP 2020.

HIST 3400 - U.S. Foreign Relations (3 credits)

This course will examine the emergence of the United States as the dominant political, economic, and military power on the world stage in the twentieth century. Students will attempt to identify reasons for this development and endeavor to come to a fuller understanding of the nature and scope of America's global commitments. The course will trace the development of American foreign relations from the Spanish-America War of 1898 through the Cold War, concluding with an examination of the evolution of American foreign policy in the post-Cold War and the ramifications of recent developments at home and abroad. Prerequisite: one HIST course and COMP 2000, 2010, or 2020 or COMP 2000H.

HIST 4700 - Genocide in the 20th Century and Beyond (3 credits)

This course will examine the history of genocide beginning in the 20th century focusing mostly on Europe and Africa: the Holocaust, the Balkans, Rwanda and Darfur. As part of this study, students will travel to see the first-hand manifestations and implications of genocide. Prerequisites: one HIST; and COMP 2000, 2010, or 2020 or COMP 2000H.

LGST 3400 - Comparative Legal Systems (3 credits)

A study of the interrelationship between cultures and legal systems; how legal systems develop as a response to, and expression of, the cultures from which they derive. Prerequisite: COMP 2000, 2010, or 2020 or COMP 2000H. 

LGST 4410 - International Law (3 credits)

An introduction to basic legal principles governing relations between nations. Topics include recognition of states, jurisdiction, human rights, treaties and agreements, law of the sea and claims against nations. Prerequisites: one LGST course; and COMP 2000, COMP 2010, or COMP 2020.

LGST 4420 - War Crimes (3 credits)

This course focuses on the issue of war crimes as well as trials of war criminals during the last hundred years. Students will consider the development and evolution of the law particularly as it relates to the definition of war crimes, genocide, ethnic cleansing, and crimes against humanity. Students will examine key historical trials as well as consider how war crimes doctrines are being applied currently in national and international venues. Prerequisite: one LGST course and COMP 2000 or 2020 or COMP 2000H. 

PHIL 3670 - Social and Political Philosophy (3 credits)

This course will examine significant philosophical contributions to an understanding of politics and society. Among the questions it will address are: What is the nature and basis of the state? Which form of government is best? How do we determine whether political institutions are just? What conceptions of human nature underlie various political philosophies? How are social goods and burdens justly divided? This course will draw from classical, modern, and contemporary sources in political philosophy. Prerequisite: COMP 2000, 2010, or 2020 or COMP 2000H.

PHIL 3300 - Ethics of War and Peace (3 credits)

This course consists in the philosophical examination of the nature, definitions, and practices of war. Special attention will be paid to the just war tradition in ethics. Prerequisite: COMP 2000, COMP 2010, or COMP 2020 or COMP 2000H.

Select 9 credits from the following courses:

BHS 4006 - Fundamentals of Chinese Medicine (3 credits)

This course will discuss and analyze the impact, origins and background of Chinese medicine. It is important to enter this class with an open mind, and understand that there are other forms of treatment for disease, different than those taught in westernized medicine programs. Critical analysis of the meridians and pathways and various signs and symptoms associated with disease will be covered. Prerequisite: COMP 1500. 

BHS 4011 - Bioterrorism: Healthcare Readiness and Response (3 credits)

This course uses a systems perspective to provide health professionals with an understanding of the prevention and response to the intentional release of armful biologic agents. Category A diseases will be reviewed including anthrax and smallpox. Risk assessment and reduction for health care facilities will be discussed. The structure of public disaster response agencies and the potential difficulties integrating with privately-held critical infrastructure will be evaluated. Tactics and structural components from the class can also be used in unintentional outbreaks to reduce their impact. Prerequisite: COMP 1500.

BHS 4013 - Global Issues in Human Trafficking (3 credits)

This course is designed to raise awareness and knowledge of the global, national and local issue of human trafficking and contemporary slavery. Students will acquire important terminology related to the issue, and recognize the various forms human trafficking can take domestically and globally. Physical and psychological impact of exploitation on the victims and traffickers recruitment methods will also be explored. Students will research the role that private citizens, professionals, government agencies, the media or faith-based organizations can play in addressing the issue. Prerequisite: COMP 1500. 

ENVS 3201 - Environment, Culture, Ethnicity, and Health (3 credits)

This course introduces students to skills and insights necessary in promoting health in diverse populations. Issues discussed include the need for effective communication; understanding of cultural factors and how they impact preventive efforts; and health care status and utilization patterns on the health care system and expenditures. The course also explores traditional modalities of health maintenance among various populations. 

HUMN 2200 - Introduction to Medical Humanities (3 credits)

This course provides students with an opportunity to explore the relationship between medicine, medical practice, and two or more disciplines within the humanities: the arts, philosophy, history, literature, and cultural studies. Students will assume an active role in discussions, presentations, and other aspects of the course. Prerequisite: COMP 1500. 

HUMN 4100 - Death and Dying (3 credits)

A multidisciplinary examination of significant topics related to the process of dying and death, such as changing western attitudes toward death, problems and solutions that may arise for those experiencing the dying process (including the dying, family, and friends), the grieving process, and non-western approaches to death and dying. Prerequisites: one ARTS, HIST, HUMN, FILM, LITR, PHIL, or THEA course; and COMP 2000, COMP 2010, or COMP 2020 or COMP 2000H. 

INST 3030 - Intro to Global Health (3 credits)

Introduction to Global Health introduces students to the main concepts of population health in a global perspective. Students discuss the biological, social, economic and geopolitical aspects of global health, with an emphasis on population groups at increased risk of health issues. Students learn the language of global health and critically think through issues of global concern, including communicable and non-communicable diseases, maternal and child health, global environmental health, malnutrition, key determinants of population health, reproductive health, and the socioeconomic and policy implications of global health. Students are taught the basics of global health assessment, planning, and intervention; the roles and functions of global health agencies; and are introduced to tools and resources needed for lifelong learning in global health.

INST 4970 - Disparities in Health: Examining the Impact of Culture and Ethnicity (3 credits)

This course introduces students to skills and insights necessary in promoting health in diverse populations. Issues discussed include the need for effective communication; understanding of cultural factors and how they impact preventive efforts; and health care status and utilization patterns on the health care system and expenditures. The course also explores traditional modalities of health maintenance among various populations.

LGST 3350 - Environmental Law and Policy (3 credits)

This course analyzes environmental quality in terms of law and policy. Specific public policy issues are surveyed to develop alternative approaches for dealing with ecological problems and for illustrating the power of public opinion. This course also provides an understanding of the norms and institutions that comprise national and international environmental law. Specific topics considered include air pollution and protection of the atmosphere, hazardous waste, endangered species, the global commons, and laws of the sea. Statutes, regulations, and judicial decisions are emphasized to provide an overall analysis of environmental law. Prerequisite: COMP 2000, COMP 2010, or COMP 2020 or COMP 2000H.

LITR 3500 - Literature and Medicine (3 credits)

This course explores the relationship between literary and historical texts and medical practice. Using critical perspectives from the humanities, the course examines such topics as the medical practitioner's role, medical themes in literature, and pathographies. Prerequisites: one LITR course; and COMP 2000, COMP 2010, or COMP 2020 or COMP 2000H or LITR 2010H or LITR 2011H or LITR 2020H or LITR 2021H or LITR 2030H or LITR 2031H. 

PHIL 3180 - Biomedical Ethics (3 credits) OR PHIL 3180H - Biomedical Ethics Honors (3 credits)

PHIL 3180 - Biomedical Ethics (3 credits)

This course provides an introduction to moral reasoning through a philosophical examination of major problems in biomedical ethics, such as abortion, euthanasia, allocation of resources, medical experimentation, genetic engineering, confidentiality, among others. Students will be introduced to the idea that ethical problems are largely a matter of reason; that progress toward solutions can be gained through an application of normative ethical (philosophical) theory. Prerequisite: COMP 2000, COMP 2010 or COMP 2020 or COMP 2000H.

PHIL 3180H - Biomedical Ethics Honors (3 credits)

This course provides an introduction to moral reasoning through a philosophical examination of major problems in biomedical ethics, such as abortion, euthanasia, allocation of resources, medical experimentation, genetic engineering, confidentiality, among others. Students will be introduced to the idea that ethical problems are largely a matter of reason, that progress toward solutions can be gained through an application of normative ethical (philosophical) theory. Prerequisite: COMP 2000, COMP 2010, or COMP 2020 or COMP 2000H.

PHIL 3360 - Environmental Ethics (3 credits)

This course provides an introduction to moral reasoning through the philosophical examination of major problems in environmental ethics, such as the relationship between human beings and living and non-living environments, controlling nature, and land use, assessing risk, responsibility to future generations, and the role of science, among others. Students will be introduced to the idea that ethical problems are largely a matter of reason; that progress toward solutions can be gained through an application of normative ethical (philosophical) theory. Prerequisite: COMP 2000, COMP 2010, or COMP 2020 or COMP 2000H. 

SPAN 3300 - Spanish for Health Professionals (3 credits)

This course focuses on intermediate-level Spanish grammar and vocabulary designed to help current and future health care professionals communicate with Spanish-speaking patients and their families. Students will also learn about the cultural context for discussing medical issues in both Spain and Latin America. Prerequisite: SPAN 2210 or SPAN 2350 or a Spanish Challenge Exam score of 93 or higher. 

Other Requirements

Students must complete a requirement involving a language relevant to their area of concentration and interest. The minimum acceptable proficiency level must be equivalent to two years of college or university basic language instruction. This requirement can be met in a number of ways, not exclusive of the following:

  1. Complete the equivalent of at least 12 foreign language credits at NSU;
  2. Complete the equivalent of at least two years of college-level foreign language courses at a regionally accredited college or university prior to transfer to NSU;
  3. Achieve a successful score on a pre-approved language proficiency exam.
Students must complete a pre-approved international travel study experience equivalent to at least 6 credits (whether through an NSU-sponsored program or otherwise). This requirement can be met by using more than one study abroad experience.

HIPS 4900 - Senior Seminar Capstone (3 credits)

This course is intended as a capstone experience for all history, political science, and international studies majors. The objective is to have the student draw on everything they have learned in their prior courses by means of an intensive study of a single topic of historical, political, or international concern or controversy. The learning method employed in this class will combine extensive readings in primary and secondary source materials with a major research paper that is subject to rigorous academic standards. Topics will vary. Prerequisites: Completion of a minimum of 90 credits and HIPS 2900: Research Methods in History and Political Science.

The Bachelor of Arts degree requires at least 24 credits of coursework from the following disciplines: ARTS, DANC, FILM, HIST, HUMN, LITR, MUSC, PHIL, and THEA, as well as an intermediate degree of competency in a foreign language (generally, a minimum of 6 credits or another demonstration of competency).

The academic program and curriculum requirements listed on this page are from the NSU Undergraduate Student Catalog. Students are bound by policies and curricula published in the catalog in effect the semester they enter the university, unless an agreement is made with appropriate NSU administration officials allowing them to abide by policies published in a later catalog.

View sample 4-Year Academic Plan

Return to top of page