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Curriculum

The interdisciplinary studies major allows students to maximize their educational experience by customizing their study around their individual areas of interest. The major affords students the opportunity to engage in substantial study in different curricular domains. The major is rooted in the core humanities and it allows students to choose any minor in the College of Arts, Humanities, and Social Sciences for an elective concentration. There is an optional track for students considering post-graduate studies in medicine.

Learning Outcomes

A successful Interdisciplinary Studies graduate is expected to:

  1. Articulate the rationale behind the choice of concentrations comprising the major.
  2. Analyze complex theories in self-identified areas of concentration.
  3. Synthesize the theories and principles from disciplines in the areas of concentration in the major into a unified, coherent project.

Curriculum Requirements

General Education Requirements (30 credits)

Students are required to complete 30 credit hours as part of the General Education Program.

Interdisciplinary Studies Major Requirements (34-37 credits or up to 54 credits if student chooses pre-med concentration)

INDS 2901 - Interdisciplinary Readings Seminar (1 credit)

The interdisciplinary studies reading seminar is designed to provide focused study on one selected text. Under faculty leadership, INDS students will read and discuss the text in small groups. Students will take a leadership role to prepare discussions. Texts will be selected on a semester-by-semester basis with a view to the highlighting an interdisciplinary approach to our understanding of our world and the society we live in. Instructors will use debate and discussion around the reading to help students select the minor concentrations they wish to pursue for the major.

INST 1500 - Global Issues (3 credits)

This course examines some of the increasingly complex and diverse issues confronting humanity. It examines the great diversity of opinion that people hold on important global issues, such as population, natural resource utilization, development, human rights, and values. Students may not receive credit for both INST 1500 and GLBS 1500. Experiential Education and Learning (ExEL): Successful completion of this course satisfies 1 ExEL unit.

SPCH 1010 - Public Speaking (3 credits)

Training and practice in the fundamentals of public speaking, including audience analysis, topic development, research, organization, language use, and delivery.

HIPS 4900 - Senior Seminar Capstone (3 credits)

This course is intended as a capstone experience for all history, political science, international studies and interdisciplinary studies majors. The objective is to have the student draw on everything they have learned in their prior courses by means of an intensive study of a single topic of historical, political, or international concern or controversy. The learning method employed in this class will combine extensive readings in primary and secondary source materials with a major research paper that is subject to rigorous academic standards. Topics will vary. Prerequisites: Completion of a minimum of 90 credits and HIPS 2900 or INDS 2901.

Select one of the following courses:

PHIL 3010 - Ethical Issues in Communication (3 credits)

This course provides an introduction to moral reasoning through a philosophical examination of major ethical problems in communications, such as those encountered by media professionals; conflicts of interest, morally offensive content, media influences on anti-social behavior, confidential sources, privacy, truth and honesty in reporting, among others. Student will be introduced to the idea Nova Southeastern University • Undergraduate Student Catalog • 2019–2020 COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 377 that ethical problems are largely a matter of normative ethical (philosophical) theory. Prerequisite: COMP 2000, COMP 2010, or COMP 2020 or COMP 2000H

PHIL 3180 - Biomedical Ethics OR PHIL 3180H - Biomedical Ethics Honors (3 credits)

This course provides an introduction to moral reasoning through a philosophical examination of major problems in biomedical ethics, such as abortion, euthanasia, allocation of resources, medical experimentation, genetic engineering, confidentiality, among others. Students will be introduced to the idea that ethical problems are largely a matter of reason; that progress toward solutions can be gained through an application of normative ethical (philosophical) theory. Prerequisite: COMP 2000, COMP 2010 or COMP 2020 or COMP 2000H.

PHIL 3200 - Ethics and Sport (3 credits)

This course provides an introduction to moral reasoning through a philosophical examination of major problems in sports, such as the nature of sportsmanship, drugs, violence, commercialization, and gender equality, among others. Students will be introduced to the idea that ethical problems are largely a matter of reason; that progress toward solutions can be gained through an application of normative ethical (philosophical) theory. Prerequisite: COMP 2000, COMP 2010 or COMP 2020 or COMP 2000H.

PHIL 3300 - Ethics of War and Peace (3 credits)

This course consists in the philosophical examination of the nature, definitions, and practices of war. Special attention will be paid to the just war tradition in ethics. Prerequisite: COMP 2000, COMP 2010, or COMP 2020 or COMP 2000H.

PHIL 3360 - Environmental Ethics (3 credits)

This course provides an introduction to moral reasoning through the philosophical examination of major problems in environmental ethics, such as the relationship between human beings and living and nonliving environments, controlling nature, and land use, assessing risk, responsibility to future generations, and the role of science, among others. Students will be introduced to the idea that ethical problems are largely a matter of reason; that progress toward solutions can be gained through an application of normative ethical (philosophical) theory. Prerequisite: COMP 2000, COMP 2010, or COMP 2020 or COMP 2000H.

 

Concentrations (21-41 credits)

Students must select one area of concentration.

Concentration I: CAHSS Minor (21-24 credits)

Any HIST or LITR at 2000 level or higher (3 credits)

Any HIST or LITR at 2000 level or higher (3 credits)

Plus any one of the following minors offered in CAHSS (15-18 credits)

Concentration II: Pre-Med Concentration (41 credits)

Any HIST or LITR at 2000 level or higher (3 credits)

Any HIST or LITR at 2000 level or higher (3 credits)

Any BIOL with Lab (4 credits)

Any BIOL with Lab (4 credits)

Any CHEM with Lab (4 credits)

Any CHEM with Lab (4 credits)

Any ORGANIC CHEM with Lab (4 credits)

Any ORGANIC CHEM with Lab (4 credits)

Any CHEM with Lab (4 credits)

Any CHEM with Lab (4 credits)

Any MATH (Statistics acceptable) (3 credits)

The academic program and curriculum requirements listed on this page are from the NSU Undergraduate Student Catalog. Students are bound by policies and curricula published in the catalog in effect the semester they enter the university, unless an agreement is made with appropriate NSU administration officials allowing them to abide by policies published in a later catalog.

View sample 4-Year Academic Plan

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