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International Studies Minor

The International Studies minor provides a broad international perspective for students who plan careers in business, government, medical and psychological services, the legal profession, or education. The courses in this minor allow students to expand their concept of social and ecological responsibility in the global arena. This minor can be combined with any major and minor except the international studies major. A minimum of 12 credits must be exclusive to the minor and cannot be counted toward any other majors/minors/certificate programs.

International Studies Minor Requirements
(18 credits)

Students must complete 18 credits from the following areas. Nine (9) credits must be at the 3000/4000 level, and a minimum of 6 credits must be in non-Western courses.

Select 3 credits from the following courses:

HUMN 1200 - Introduction to World Religions (3 credits)

This course provides an introduction to significant forms of religion around the world, including Hinduism, Buddhism, Confucianism, Taoism, Shinto, Judaism, Christianity, and Islam, as well as tribal religious traditions and beliefs. The course will focus on the historical development of these faiths, as well as look at the worldview of each of these traditions, to develop a better understanding and appreciation for the diverse religious traditions of the world.

INST 1500 - Global Issues (3 credits)

This course examines some of the increasingly complex and diverse issues confronting humanity. It examines the great diversity of opinion that people hold on important global issues, such as population, natural resource utilization, development, human rights, and values. Students may not receive credit for both INST 1500 and GLBS 1500.

Select 9 credits from either the Arts, Literature, and Culture subject area or from the History, Law, and Government subject area, and select 6 credits from the other subject area:

Arts, Literature, and Culture Subject Area

ARTS 3300 - Myth and Art (3 credits)

This course focuses on the relations between verbal and visual arts, particularly the myths and epics of Europe and the Mediterranean world, and the later literary, religious, and artistic traditions developing from them. Prerequisites: One ARTS course and COMP 2000 or COMP 2000H or COMP 2010 or COMP 2020.

HUMN 2300 - Introduction to World Mythology (3 credits)

This course provides a broad overview of myths from various geographic areas and historical periods, including Egyptian, Mesopotamian, Greek, Roman, Celtic, Germanic, Asian, North and South American, African and Australian traditions. The course emphasizes the importance of myth in world cultures. Prerequisite: COMP 1500 or COMP 1500H.

HUMN 2350 - Introduction to Folklore (3 credits)

This course explores various definitions of folklore, focusing on the ways that literature, art, music, performance, and religion all contribute to a culture. Students will be exposed to multiple storytelling techniques and how the many disciplines included in the study of folklore can be understood as forms of narration that tell the story of a culture's evolution. Folklore of different ethnographic backgrounds will be covered, including modern American folklore. Prerequisite: COMP 1500 or COMP 1500H.

HUMN 2400 - Introduction to Celtic Studies (3 credits)

This course provides an introduction to the languages, literatures, history, art, mythology and cultures of the Celtic peoples of Europe, from ancient Gaul, Britain and Ireland to the 21st century. Prerequisites: COMP 1500 or COMP 1500H.

HUMN 3800 - Mexican Cult of Death in Myth and Literature (3 credits)

This course examines the Mexican Cult of Death as an ubiquitous theme in Mexican arts and letters. Prerequisites: One ARTS, FILM, HIST, HUMN, LITR, or PHIL course; and COMP 2000, 2010, or 2020 or COMP 2000H. 

HUMN 4200 - Asian Thought* (3 credits)

An introduction to the fundamental teachings of significant religious and philosophical systems of Asia, offering a broad overview of such topics as Wu Wei, karma, reincarnation, impermanence, the nature of the mind, the paths of enlightenment, and basic practices such as meditation and compassionate action. Prerequisites: one ARTS, FILM, HIST, HUMN, LITR, PHIL or THEA course; and COMP 2000, COMP 2010, or COMP 2020.

LITR 2030 - World Literature I (3 credits)

A survey of selected masterpieces by international writers from antiquity through the Renaissance, emphasizing the evolution of world culture. Prerequisite: COMP 1500 or COMP 1500H. 

LITR 2031 - World Literature II (3 credits)

A survey of selected masterpieces by international writers from the 17th century through the 20th century, emphasizing the evolution of world culture. Prerequisite: COMP 1500 or COMP 1500H. 

LITR 3510 - Irish Literature (3 credits)

A study of Irish and Celtic literatures, focusing on early Irish myth and medieval literature translated from Gaelic, the literature of the Irish Renaissance in the early 20th century, and contemporary Irish poetry and prose. Prerequisites: one LITR course; and COMP 2000, COMP 2010, or COMP 2020 or COMP 2000H. 

LITR 3530 - Caribbean Literature (3 credits)

A study of Caribbean literature from early post-Colombian literature, such as slave narratives and travel writing, to modern Caribbean poetry and prose. The emphasis is on literature written in English, but the course includes works that have been translated into English from other languages, including French and Spanish. This course provides an introduction to the literature of the Caribbean and a framework for studying that material. Prerequisites: one LITR course; and COMP 2000, COMP 2010, or COMP 2020 or COMP 2000H.

LITR 3540 - Latin American Literature* (3 credits)

A survey of Latin American literature in translation. Prerequisite: one LITR course; and COMP 2000, COMP 2010, or COMP 2020 or COMP 2000H. 

LITR 4510 - King Arthur (3 credits)

This course traces the origins and development of the legend of King Arthur, Queen Guinevere, and the Knights of the Round Table from the 5th to the 21st century. Prerequisites: one LITR course; and COMP 2000, COMP 2010, or COMP 2020. 

SPAN 3240 - Introduction to Spanish Literature (3 credits)

An introductory literature course intended to familiarize students with the literature of Spain from the medieval period until the twentieth century and to develop skills in literary analysis. Class discussions, readings, oral and written work all in Spanish. Prerequisite: SPAN 2350 or SPAN 3000 or a Spanish Challenge Exam score of 93 or higher.

SPAN 3250 - Introduction to Latin American Literature* (3 credits)

An introductory literature course intended to familiarize students with the literature of Latin America through selected readings in all genres and to develop skills in literary analysis. Class discussions, readings, oral and written work all in Spanish. Prerequisite: SPAN 2350 or SPAN 3000 or a Spanish Challenge Exam score of 93 or higher. 

SPAN 4900 - Special Topics in Spanish Literature (3 credits)

An in-depth study of a period, an author or a literary genre in the Spanish language. Class discussions, readings, oral and written work all in Spanish. May be repeated once for credit, if content changes, and with written consent of division director. Prerequisite: one 3000-level SPAN course. 

History, Law, and Government Subject Area

HIST 1150 - Early World History* (3 credits)

A study of the development of world civilizations, examining the interrelationships of the various regions of the world from Prehistoric times through 1500, including the rise of world communities, cultures, religions, and empires, tracing the development of trade, economics, political forms, the creation of the nation-state, and on the development of technology and the use of war of resolve cultural/religious/national conflicts. 

HIST 1160 - Modern World History* (3 credits)

A study of the interrelationships of world civilizations of the various regions of the world in the post-Renaissance era, examining the major world communities, cultures, and religions, tracing the modernization of economics and political systems, and the relations between modern nation-states. The course will also examine the collapse of colonialism, the beginning and end of the Cold War, the use of technology and warfare to resolve cultural/religious/ national conflicts, and the role played by the United States in world affairs in the modern era.

HIST 2130 - Formation of Latin America* (3 credits)

An interdisciplinary study of ancient American and Latin American systems and societies. The course examines ways in which essential elements of indigenous cultures have had an impact on the development of Latin American political, social, and economic institutions; the impact of Iberian history and socioeconomic systems on the discovery, colonization, and development of American nations; the legacy of Spanish and Portuguese colonialism to emerging Latin American states; and the major goals and consequences of 19th century neocolonialism. Prerequisite: COMP 1500 or COMP 1500H.

HIST 2140 - Modern Latin America* (3 credits)

Using Latin America and the Caribbean as a focal point, the course provides an interdisciplinary overview of contemporary American systems and societies and their place in a rapidly changing, increasingly interdependent world. Topics discussed will include the causes and goals of revolution in Latin America, Latin American debt and development, U.S.-Latin American relations, and a new hemispheric order for the 21st century. Prerequisite: COMP 1500 or COMP 1500H. 

HIST 2300 - Caribbean History* (3 credits)

This course traces the history of the Caribbean from the fifteenth century to the present, examining such issues as indigenous peoples and the early years of European settlement and colonization, the construction of African slavery, the changing place of the Caribbean in the world economy, various aspects of slave society, and the abolition of slavery. Revolution and struggles for independence will be emphasized, as will be U.S. imperialism, migration, and the rise of intellectual, artistic and literary movements in Caribbean island nations. Prerequisite: COMP 1500 or COMP 1500H. 

HIST 2400 - African History* (3 credits)

This class will focus on Africa as a vast continent that is characterized by enormous ethnic, religious, geographic, and historical diversity. Emphasis will be on the transatlantic slave trade and its impact on Africa and Africa's relations with the outside world. European colonization of Africa and the extent to which it shaped the modern history of the continent; and the history of South Africa and the rise and fall of the Apartheid Regime. Prerequisite: COMP 1500 or COMP 1500H. 

HIST 3140 - The Holocaust (3 credits)

A study of the history of the Holocaust. This course will look at the causes, reasons, results, and implications of the Holocaust from both a European and American perspective. Prerequisites: one HIST course; and COMP 2000, COMP 2010, or COMP 2020. 

HIST 3240 - Irish History (3 credits)

This course will study Irish history from the Neolithic era to the 21st century, focusing on the colonial relation between Britain and Ireland, including the 17th-century Plantation, the Cromwellian and Williamite wars, the United Irishmen and the 1798 Rising, the Act of Union, the Great Hunger (Famine) and emigration to America, and the formation of the Irish Republic and the Northern Irish state in 1922. Prerequisites: one HIST course; and COMP 2000 or COMP 2010 or COMP 2020 or COMP 2000H.

HIST 3400 - U.S. Foreign Relations (3 credits)

This course will examine the emergence of the United States as the dominant political, economic, and military power on the world stage in the twentieth century. Students will attempt to identify reasons for this development and endeavor to come to a fuller understanding of the nature and scope of America's global commitments. The course will trace the development of American foreign relations from the Spanish-America War of 1898 through the Cold War, concluding with an examination of the evolution of American foreign policy in the post-Cold War and the ramifications of recent developments at home and abroad. Prerequisite: one HIST course and COMP 2000, 2010, or 2020 or COMP 2000H. 

LGST 3400 - Comparative Legal Systems (3 credits)

A study of the interrelationship between cultures and legal systems; how legal systems develop as a response to, and expression of, the cultures from which they derive. Prerequisite: COMP 2000, 2010, or 2020 or COMP 2000H.

LGST 4410 - International Law (3 credits)

An introduction to basic legal principles governing relations between nations. Topics include recognition of states, jurisdiction, human rights, treaties and agreements, law of the sea and claims against nations. Prerequisites: one LGST course; and COMP 2000, COMP 2010, or COMP 2020. 

PHIL 3670 - Social and Political Philosophy (3 credits)

This course will examine significant philosophical contributions to an understanding of politics and society. Among the questions it will address are: What is the nature and basis of the state? Which form of government is best? How do we determine whether political institutions are just? What conceptions of human nature underlie various political philosophies? How are social goods and burdens justly divided? This course will draw from classical, modern, and contemporary sources in political philosophy. Prerequisite: COMP 2000, 2010, or 2020 or COMP 2000H.

POLS 2010 - Comparative Government (3 credits)

This course will examine the elements of foreign political systems such as constitutions, political parties, institutions, historical development, and ideology using the United States as a frame of reference. Attention will be given to how legislation is enacted, how elections are conducted, and the relationship between the judicial, executive, and legislative branches of government. 

* Non-Western courses

The academic program and curriculum requirements listed on this page are from the NSU Undergraduate Student Catalog. Students are bound by policies and curricula published in the catalog in effect the semester they enter the university, unless an agreement is made with appropriate NSU administration officials allowing them to abide by policies published in a later catalog.

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