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Humanities Research at NSU

Affiliated Humanities Faculty

Bio

James Doan, Ph.D., is a Professor of humanities in the Department of Literature and Modern Languages in the College of Arts, Humanities, and Social Sciences (CAHSS). Since 1988, he has taught courses at NSU in literature, the arts, folklore, mythology and world religions, as well as courses in the Farquhar Honors College. He developed and chaired a faculty lecture series at the university from 2006 to 2017. His research interests include the legend of King Arthur; late Renaissance English drama; Irish and Celtic literature; the figure of the vampire in myth, legend and film; and the supernatural in general.

Selected Works

Books

VampireBrodman, B., & Doan, J. E. (2013). The Universal Vampire: Origins And Evolution Of A Legend. Madison [N.J.] : Fairleigh Dickinson University Press, co-published with The Rowman & Littlefield Pub. Group, Inc., 2013.





 
SupernaturalBrodman, B., & Doan, J. E. (2016). The Supernatural Revamped: From Timeworn Legends To Twenty-First-Century Chic. Madison : Fairleigh Dickinson University Press, 2016.







ChicBrodman, B., & Doan, J. E. (2017). Apocalyptic Chic: Visions Of The Apocalypse And Post-Apocalypse In Literature And Visual Arts. Fairleigh Dickinson University Press, co-published with The Rowman & Littlefield Pub. Group, Inc., 2017.





Presentations

  • Doan, J. I Kyd You Not: reading at 53rd Biennial Doane Family Association meeting, Saginaw, MI, July 22, 2014.
  • Doan, J. The Irish Dracula: Vampires without Fangs: paper presented at The Supernatural in Literature and Film conference, Dublin, Ireland, 2014.
  • Doan, J. Never Gamble with the Devil: Contests with Auld Nick in Irish Tradition: Readings/presentations at Southern Regional American Conference for Irish Studies meeting, Rome, GA, 2015.
  • Doan, J. Allegory and Numerology in Apocalyptic Endgames: Paper presented at the 6th International Conference on Religion and Spirituality in Society, Washington, DC, 2016.
  • Doan, J. Hominin Migrations Past and Present: Presentation at the CAHSS Intellectual Conversation with Emily Schmitt, Fort Lauderdale, FL, January 19, 2017.
  • Doan, J. Haplogroup Migrations to the U.K., Leading to the 16th Century Do(a)ne Family: presentation at the Doane Family Association meeting, Fredericksburg, VA, July 26, 2018.

Bio

Aileen Miyuki Farrar is an Assistant Professor and Interim Associate Chair for the Department of Literature and Modern Languages in the College of Arts, Humanities, and Social Sciences (CAHSS). She received her Ph.D. in English from the University of Louisiana at Lafayette where she focused on the interdisciplinary culture of nineteenth-century British literature and science as well as trained in Restoration and eighteenth-century British literature, early American literature, and women’s literature and feminist theory. After teaching for two years as a Lecturer of Public Humanities in the Comparative Cultural Studies Department at Northern Arizona University, a position which emphasized environmental and public humanities, she arrived at NSU in 2016, where she has coordinated and developed curriculum for the Medical Humanities minor and teaches courses in Medical Humanities; American, British, and World Literature; and Literary Criticism and Theory.

Selected Works

Articles

  • “Wuthering Heights: Dreams of Equilibrium in Physiology and Physics.” Victorian Review. The Brontës and Critical Interventions in Victorian Studies Special Issue (Fall 2016).
  • “Charles Dickens and Hablot K. Browne: Cross-Narrative Creation and Collaboration in Bleak House.” Victorians: A Journal of Culture and Literature. Charles Dickens Special Ed. 122 (Fall 2012).

Presentations

  • “F.D. Bedford’s Childhood in a Drawer: The Illustrated ‘Lost’ Realities of Peter Pan,” Symposium on Nineteenth-Century Literature and the Graphic Arts: A Single Drop of Ink for a Mirror in Princeton, NJ, 4 Oct. 2019.
  • “The Beauty and Truth of Self-Destruction: Female Autoeroticism in Garland’s Annihilation,” Popular Culture Association (PCA) in Washington, D.C. 17-20 Apr. 2019.
  • “The Hypertext and Imagined Communities: Technologies of Self and Culture,” Digital Curriculum Conference: Going Deeply Digital in Fort Lauderdale, FL, 15-16 Feb. 2019.
  • “The Nature of the Medicinal Mother and Female Epic in ‘Goblin Market’,” Victorians Institute Conference (VIC) in Greenville, SC, 13-14 Oct. 2017.
  • “Lost Roses: Cross-Fertilization and Hybridization in The Moonstone,” Conference of the Victorian Interdisciplinary Studies Association of the Western United States (VISAWUS) in Austin, TX, 28 Sept.-1 Oct. 2016.
  • “Reforming the Specters of Science in Frankenstein: A Monster’s Newtonian Philosophy,” International Conference on Romanticism (ICR) in Park City, UT, 15-17 Oct. 2015.
  • “Reinventing the Dare: Frankenstein, Science Fiction, and the Culture of Science,” Frankenstein Bicentennial Project, Arizona State U, Phoenix, AZ, 28-30 Apr. 2014.
  • “The Web of Spectral Reflections in Turn of the Screw,” Victorians Institute Conference (VIC) in Murfreesboro, TN, 1-2 Nov. 2013.
  • “Narrative Autophagy: The Consuming and Consumed Ouroboros of British Imperial Travel Narratives,” South Atlantic Modern Language Association (SAMLA) Conference in Durham, NC, 8-11 Nov. 2012.
  • “The Bodily Reform and Upheaval of Nineteenth-Century American Sensibility: A Rhetoric of Corpses,” Craft Critique Culture Conference in Iowa City, IA, 30 Mar.-1 Apr., 2012.

Bio

My research focuses on Latin American, Hispanic Caribbean and Latinx literature and cultures, feminism and gender studies, and foreign language pedagogy. I am especially interested in historical fiction, travel narratives, the autobiography and autofiction. Most of my scholarly research has centered on Cuban and Cuban-American women writers, in particular the role of gender, race, exile/diaspora, and transnationalism in the post-1959 Cuban narratives of authors living on and off the island, such as Yanitiza Canetti, Daína Chaviano and Wendy Guerra. My most recent interest is on digital technology, in particular Digital Humanities and the ways in which DH provides a platform for scholars to share their research virtually with fellow scholars, students and individuals in their local communities and beyond.

Selected Works

Articles & Book Chapters

Presentations

  • Fuentes, Y. Breaking the Silence: Writing and Sexuality in the Narrative of Wendy Guerra: presented at the PCA/ACA National Conference, Seattle, Washington, March 22-25, 2016.
  • Fuentes, Y. Daughters of the Post-Revolution: Contemporary Cuban Women Writers: presented at the 98th Annual AATSP Conference, Miami, Florida, July 8-11, 2016.
  • Fuentes, Y. Incorporating Literature and Culture into the Spanish Language Classroom: presented at the 99th Annual AATSP Conference, Chicago, Illinois, July 6-9, 2017.
  • Fuentes, Y. Preparing Students for the Future: Practical Ideas for Teaching Specialized Spanish: presented at the 100th Annual AATSP Conference, Salamanca, Spain, June 25-28, 2018.
  • Fuentes, Y. From the Foreign Language Classroom to the (Virtual) World: presentation at the Digital Curriculum Conference, Nova Southeastern University, Ft. Lauderdale, FL, February 15-16, 2019.

Bio

David Kilroy is a Professor in the Department of History and Political Science. His research interests include the history of U.S. foreign policy and national security, U.S. and international political history, African-American military history, and Irish history.

Selected Works

Books

RaceKilroy, D. P. (2003). For Race and Country: The Life and Career of Colonel Charles Young. Westport, CT: Praeger Publishers, [2003]. 







DecisionNojeim, M.J., & Kilroy, D. P. (2011). Days of Decision: Turning Points in U.S. Foreign Policy. Washinton, D.C.: Potomac Books, [2011].






Digital Projects

Articles & Book Chapters

  • Kilroy, D. P. (2001). Old Army Pioneer: The Early Career of Charles Young. Journal of the American Military Past, 28 (Spring/Summer 2001), 77-88.
  • Kilroy, D. P. (2002). Alone at West Point: The Military Education of Charles Young, 1884–1889. The Historian, 64(3/4), 587.
  • Kilroy, D. P. (2013). “Being a Member of the Colored Race”: The Mission of Charles Young, Military Attaché to Haiti, 1904-07. Carla Calargé et al, Eds., Haiti and the Americas, 96-107.
  • Kilroy, D. P. (2013). Charles Young, the Talented Tenth, and America Empire. Timeline, 30:3, (July/September 2013), 38-54
  • Kilroy, D. P. (20xx). An Example for Other Small Nations to Follow: John F. Kennedy, Ireland and Decolonization,” book chapter in Cyrus Schayegh, Ed., Globalizing the US Presidency: Postcolonial Views of John F. Kennedy, forthcoming.

Bio

As a philosopher, my current humanities research interests tend to focus on relationships between and among animals, both human and non-human. Specifically, I’m interested in exploring the nature of friendship, the nature of morality, and the sorts of emotional and cognitive capacities necessary for both and the implications such explorations have for our personal and political relationships. Exploring these issues thoroughly requires an appreciation of work beyond the discipline of philosophy that includes art, literature, psychology, anthropology, animal behavior, cognitive science, among others.

Selected Works

Articles & Book Chapters

  • Mulvey, B. (2008). "Can there be a Regional (Caribbean) Philosophy?" Conversations In Philosophy: Crossing The Boundaries, Ochieng’-Odhiambo, F., Burton, R., & Brandon, E. (Eds.), 175-185.
  • Mulvey, B. (2013). "Vengeance Between Friends: Aristotle and Film" What Is the Problem With Revenge? Eds. Baker, A., Doran, S. E., & O'Grady, M., Oxford, United Kingdom: Inter-Disciplinary Press, 2013.
  • Mulvey, B. (2015). "Animal and Human Friendships in Film" in Who's Talking Now: Multispecies Relations Analysis from Humans and Animals' Point of View, edited by Chiara Blanco and Bel Deering. Oxford, United Kingdom: Inter-Disciplinary Press, 2015.
  • Mulvey, B. (2018). "Can Humans and Robots be Friends?" Dialogue and Universalism, No.2, 2018.

Presentations

  • Mulvey, B. Film, Friendship, and Philosophy: paper presented at the Film-Philosophy Conference, Liverpool, July 7, 2011.
  • Mulvey, B. Vengeance Between Friends: Aristotle and Film, paper presented at the Third Global Conference, Revenge: A Persons Project, Mansfield College, Oxford, July 18, 2012.
  • Mulvey, B. Bad People and Good Friends: Crime Films and Aristotle: paper presented at the Forty-Fourth Annual PCA-ACA Conference, Chicago, April 19, 2014.
  • Mulvey, B. Animal and Human Friendships in Film: paper presented at the First Global Conference, The Human-Animal Bond, Mansfield College, Oxford, England, July 15, 2014.

Bio

Andrea Shaw Nevins is Assistant Dean for Academic Affairs in the College of Arts, Humanities, and Social Sciences. Her areas of research interest include Caribbean popular culture, Caribbean history and literature, Africana studies, creative writing, body culture studies, and higher education leadership.

Selected Works

Books

DisobedienceShaw, A. E. (2006). The Embodiment Of Disobedience: Fat Black Women’s Unruly Political Bodies. Lanham, MD: Lexington Press, [2006].





JujuShaw Nevins, A. E. (2019). Working Juju: Representations Of The Fantastical Caribbean. University of Georgia Press [Forthcoming Fall 2019].






Digital Projects

  • Served as founding managing co-editor for University of Miami’s Anthurium, a peer reviewed digital Caribbean Studies journal that publishes original works and critical studies of Caribbean literature, theater, film, art, and culture. I currently serve on the editorial board. (2003 – 2005)
  • Served as associate managing editor for sx salon: A Small Axe Literary Platform, a digital forum for innovative critical and creative explorations of Caribbean literature. (2010 to 2015)
  • Wrote and voiced “The Venus Monologues,” for the New York-based creative collective DIS. “The Venus Monologues” features an animated version of the famous 30,000-year-old statue, the Venus of Willendorf, which was discovered in Austria in 1908. In the monologues, Venus offers a revisionist account of her life. The installation DIS │ A Good Crisis features the monologues and is on view at The Baltimore Museum of Art from November 14, 2018, through November 17, 2019.

Articles & Book Chapters

  • Shaw, A. E. (2012). “‘Tuck in Yuh Belly’: Imperatives of Female Slenderness in Jamaican Dancehall Music.” Fat Studies: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Body Weight and Society. 1.2 (2012): 140 – 152.
  • Shaw, A. E. (2014). “The Gaze of the Natives: Visualizing Reggae Music as Cd Artwork.” Palimpsest: A Journal on Women, Gender, and the Black International. 3:1 (2014): 33 – 49.
  • Shaw. A. E. (2016). “The Haunting of a Nation.” The Supernatural Revamped: From Timeworn Legends to 21st Century Chic. Eds. Barbara Brodman and Jim Doan. Farleigh Dickinson Press (2016): 71 – 82.
  • Shaw, A. E. (2018). “’Fat’ as Political Disobedience: Black Women Blogging the Resistance." Embodiment and Eating Disorders. Co-authored with Jazmyn Brown. Eds. Hillary L. McBride and Janelle L. Kwee. Routledge (2018). 231-247.
  • Shaw, A. E. (2019). "Born in Chanel, Christen in Gucci." Dancehall: A Reader on Jamaican Music and Culture. Ed. Sonjah Niah Stanley. University of the West Indies Press (Forthcoming Summer 2019).

Bio

My humanities research interests focus on film studies, particularly film noir, classic film studies, and film adaptation.

Selected Works

Books

MirrorSantos, M. (2010). The Dark Mirror: Psychiatry And Film Noir. Lanham, MD: Lexington Books, [2010]. 








VVVSantos, M. (2013). Verse, Voice, And Vision: Poetry And The Cinema. Lanham, MD: The Scarecrow Press, Inc., [2013]. 






Articles & Book Chapters

  • Santos, M. (2008). “‘You Gotta Eat Somethin’’: Food, Violence, and Perversity in Scorsese’s Urban Films.” You Are What You Eat: Literary Probes Into The Palate. Ed. Annette Magid. Cambridge Scholars Press, 2008.
  • Santos, M. (2011). “Adaptation and Sunshine State: Nature and Nostalgia in Contemporary Florida Films.” Southerners On Film: Essays On Hollywood Portrayals Since The 1970’s. Ed. Andrew Leiter. McFarland, 2011.
  • Santos, M. (2012). “‘People can think themselves into anything’: The Domestic Nightmare in My Name is Julia Ross.” The Films Of Joseph Lewis. Ed. Gary Rhodes. Wayne State University Press, 2012.
  • Santos, M. (2015). “This Never Happened to the Other Fellow’: On Her Majesty’s Secret Service as Bond Woman’s Film.” For His Eyes Only: The Women Of James Bond. Ed. Lisa Funnell. Columbia University Press, 2015.
  • Santos, M. (2015). “‘These two pretty children/flew away’: Myth and Migration in The Night of the Hunter.” South Atlantic Review, 80.1-2 (Dec. 2015): 82-95.
  • Santos, M. (2017). “‘I never did think he was crazy’”: Mystery and Criminality in Boetticher’s Psychological Noirs.” The Films Of Budd Boetticher. Ed. Gary Rhodes and Robert Singer. Edinburgh University Press, March 2017.
  • Santos, M. (2017). “‘A gray web woven by a thousand spiders’: Dream Sequence Construction in Film Noir.” Film Noir: Light And Shadow. Ed. Alain Silver and James Ursini. Applause Theatre & Cinema Books, March 2017.
  • Santos, M. (2018). “That Sinking Feeling: Cornell Woolrich and the Uncanny Noir Mood” Film Noir Prototypes: Origins Of The Movement. Ed. Alain Silver and James Ursini. Applause Theatre & Cinema Books, May 2018.

Bio

My current humanities research interests focus on the intersection between law and narrative. Specifically, I am examining the rhetoric used in legal documents to describe women’s experiences of abortion from both the “pro-life” perspective and the “pro-choice” perspective. I will then compare this to women’s own narratives on both sides of this debate to examine the connections and lack thereof between the political rhetoric and women’s own descriptions of their experiences. My goal is to determine whether there is more common ground for women on issues related to reproduction and mothering than the current political debate indicates.

Selected Works

Articles & Book Chapters

  • Toscano, V. (2005). Misguided retribution: criminalization of pregnant women who take drugs. Social & Legal Studies, 14(3), 359-386.
  • Toscano, V. (2015). Forced Sonograms and Compelled Speech Abortion Regulations: A Constitutional Analysis. International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics, 8 (1), Spring 2015, 168-181.

Presentations

  • Toscano, V. The Failure of Desert Based Justifications for Punishment, Panel presentation at the 36th Conference on Value Inquiry: Wrongdoing and its Consequences, Southern Illinois University, Carbondale, IL 2011.
  • Toscano, V. Natural Mothers: Gender Essentialism in Abortion Law, Presentation at the Intellectual Conversations Faculty Lecture Series, Nova Southeastern University, 2017.
  • Toscano, V. Natural Mothers: The Rhetoric of Abortion Law, Panel presentation at the annual meeting of the Association for the Law, Culture, and the Humanities, Washington, DC, 2018.

Bio

Kathleen J. Waites, Ph.D. is a full-time professor of English and Gender Studies in the Department of Literature and Modern Languages in the College of Arts, Humanities, and Social Sciences (CAHSS), as well as in NSU’s Honors College. Co-founder of NSU’s Gender Studies minor and the NSU chapter of the American Association of University Women, she teaches a wide range of literature, film studies, and gender studies classes. Her scholarly work focuses on autobiography, film studies, and the representation of gender in visual media. Her work has appeared in a variety of scholarly journals and in edited texts.

Selected Works

Books

WaitesWaites, K.J. (2006). Particular Friendships: A Convent Memoir. Philadelphia, [PA]: Xlibris, 2006.

 

 

 

 

Articles

  • Waites, K.J. (2019). “Feminism-Reboot in Mad Max: Fury Road and The Handmaid’s Tale.” Utopia and Dystopia in the Age of Trump: Images in Literature and Visual Arts. Ed. Barbara Brodman and James Doan. NY: Farleigh Dickinson University Press with Rowan and Littlefield, 2019.
  • Waites, K.J. (2018). “Feminism.” Encyclopedia of Evolutionary Psychological Science. NY: Springer, Summer 2018.
  • Waites, K.J. (2018). “The ‘I’ and the ‘Eye’: Mediated Perspective in the Documemoir”. Mediating Memory: Tracing the Limits of Memoir. Eds. Bunty Avieson, Fiona Giles and Sue Joseph. NY: Routledge, 2018.
  • Waites, K.J. (2017). “Hollywood’s Warrior Woman in the New Millennium.” Bad Girls and Transgressive Women in Contemporary Television, Fiction, and Film. Ed. Julie A. Chappel and Mallory Young. NY: Palgrave Macmillan, 2017.
  • Waites, K.J. (2016). “Sara Polley’s Stories We Tell: The Refracted Subject. Biography: An Interdisciplinary Quarterly. 38.4, Fall 2016.
  • Waites, K.J. (2007). “Babes in Boots: Hollywood’s Oxymoronic Warrior Woman.” Chick Flicks: Contemporary Women at the Movies. Ed. Suzanne Ferriss and Mallory Young. NY: Routledge, 2007.

Presentations

  • Waites, K.J. BBC America’s Killing Eve and the Female Villain du Jour. PCAS. Wilmington, NC. September 29, 2019.
  • Waites, K.J. The Impersonal Personal and Paradox in Kay Ryan’s Poetry. PCA/ACA. Washington, D.C. April 19, 2019.
  • Waites, K.J. Post-Apocalyptic Fiction in the Age of Trump: Feminism Reboot in Mad Max, Fury Road and The Handmaid’s Tale. PCA South, Savannah, GA. October 5, 2017.

Bio

Professor in the Department of History and Political Science in the College of Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences of Nova Southeastern University. A former Distinguished Professor of the Year (2012) and the author of seven books and many articles, Zelden teaches and writes about the intersections that lay at the border between history, politics and the law. Among his current writing projects are “Race, Power, and the Law: Southern Legal and Constitutional History” (co-authored with Sally Hadden) in Lorri Glover and Craig Thompson Friend, eds., Reinterpreting Southern History: Historiographical Essays (Baton Rouge: LSU Press, [forthcoming in November 2019]); The American Judicial System: A Very Short Introduction [under contract with Oxford University Press, expected publication date fall 2020]; and The Judge Intuitive: Joseph C. Hutcheson, Jr., Southern Federal Judge [research in progress]. Zelden is also a faculty member of the Farquhar Honors College at NSU where he regularly teaches interdisciplinary humanities seminars on Utopias and Dystopias, Witch Hunts in American History, Future History and Culture Wars.

Selected Works

Books

TrialZelden, C. L. (2002). Voting Rights On Trial: A Handbook With Cases, Laws, And Documents. Santa Barbara, Calif: ABC-CLIO.







BallotZelden, C. L. (2004). The Battle For The Black Ballot: Smith V. Allwright And The Defeat Of The Texas All-White Primary. Lawrence, KA: University Press of Kansas, [2004].







BushZelden, C. L. (2008). Bush V. Gore: Exposing The Hidden Crisis In American Democracy. Lawrence, KA: University Press of Kansas, [2008].







MarshallZelden, C. L. (2013). Thurgood Marshall: Race, Rights, And The Struggle For A More Perfect Union. New York, NY : Routledge, [2013].







ElectionsZelden, C. L. (2010). The Supreme Court And Elections: Into The Political Thicket. Washington, D.C.: CQ Press, [2010]. 






Articles & Book Chapters

  • Zelden, C. L. (1999). “From Rights to Resources: The Southern Federal District Courts and the Transformation of Civil Rights in Education, 1968-1974”. Akron Law Review, 32(3), 471-528.
  • Zelden, C. L. (2009). “’In no event shall a Negro be eligible’: The NAACP takes on the Texas All White Primary, 1923-1944”. Long Is The Way And Hard: One Hundred Years Of The NAACP, University of Arkansas Press, 2009.
  • Zelden, C. L. (2013). “The Southern Roots of the Reapportionment Revolution,” Signposts: New Directions In Southern Legal History. Eds. Sally Hadden and Patricia Minter. University of Georgia Press, April 2013.
  • Zelden, C. L. (2013). “Old Vinegar in a New Bottle: Vote Denial in the 2000 Presidential Election and Beyond.” Winning While Losing? Civil Rights, The Conservative Movement And The Presidency From Nixon To Obama. University of Florida Press, December 2013.
  • Zelden, C. L. (2017). “How Do You Feel About Writing Dissents”? Thurgood Marshall’s Dissenting Vision for America. Journal of Supreme Court History, 42(1), 77–100.
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