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Curriculum

The Sociology major focuses on the study of human behavior in social contexts. It examines the interactive dynamics of social institutions, organizations, and everyday life and studies how people group themselves (families, social groups, formal organizations, societies); how they behave in groups (collective action, social change, crime and delinquency); and how characteristics like age, race, social class, and gender affect relationships with others and with organizations and institutions. The major combines humanistic and scientific perspectives to study urban and rural life, family patterns, social change, health care and illness, crime and violence, social class, technology and communications, social movements, and many other social issues and problems.

Learning Outcomes

The successful sociology graduate is expected to:

  1. Demonstrate an understanding of the major theories and concepts that underlie the following core areas of sociology:
    1. Socialization and Social Interaction;
    2. Groups, Organizations, and Social Institutions;
    3. Stratification and Social Inequality;
    4. Global Cultural Perspectives;
    5. Qualitative and/or Quantitative Research Measurement, Design, and Methodology;
  2. Describe and analyze the three major sociological approaches: Structural Functional, Social Conflict, and
    Symbolic Interaction;
  3. Integrate and apply the major theories, principles, and concepts of sociology to address research and/or applied
    issues in the field of sociology using critical thinking skills, skeptical inquiry, and the sociological perspective;
  4. Present written sociological information in a clear, concise manner that is consistent with professional standards.

Curriculum Requirements

General Education Requirements (30 credits)

Students are required to complete 30 credit hours as part of the General Education Program.

Sociology Major Requirements (45 credits)

ANTH 1020 - Introduction to Anthropology (3 credits)

This course is an interdisciplinary examination of the ways in which anthropologists study people and their ways of life across cultures and across time. The four major fields of anthropology will be introduced with an overview of each of the following perspectives: cultural anthropology, biological anthropology, archaeology, and linguistics. 

MATH 2020 - Applied Statistics (3 credits) OR MATH 2020H - Applied Statistics Honors (3 credits)

MATH 2020 - Applied Statistics (3 credits)

This course is an introductory course in the use of descriptive and inferential statistics. Topics include graphical and numerical descriptive measures, probability, common random variables and their distributions including the binomial and normal distributions, the Central Limit Theorem, sampling procedures, confidence intervals, and hypothesis testing. This course has been exempted from the requirements of the Writing Across the Curriculum policy. Prerequisite: MATH 1040 or higher. 

MATH 2020H - Applied Statistics Honors (3 credits)

This course is an introductory course in the use of descriptive and inferential statistics. Topics include graphical and numerical descriptive measures, probability, common random variables and their distributions including the binomial and normal distributions, the Central Limit Theorem, sampling procedures, confidence intervals, and hypothesis testing. This course has been exempted from the requirements of the Writing Across the Curriculum policy. Prerequisite: MATH 1040 or higher; Honors students only.

SOCL 1020 - Introduction to Sociology (3 credits)

This course is concerned with the nature and needs of people, their relationships to their societies, and the manner in which they govern those relationships by establishing groups and institutions, engaging in social processes and bringing about social change. Special emphasis will be placed on culture in the United States and the impact of technology on the modern person. 

SOCL 2510 - Social Problems (3 credits)

Focuses on a number of contemporary social problems, analyzing causative factors and exploring alternative solutions. Examines the role of community service agencies in the improvement of some of these problems. Prerequisite: SOCL 1020. 

SOCL 3000 - Research Methods in the Social Sciences (3 credits)

Introduction to qualitative research designs commonly used in the social sciences. Discussion of data collection methods such as participant observation and interviewing, focus groups, case studies and ethnographies. Prerequisites: SOCL 1020 or ANTH 1020.

SOCL 3250 - Social Theory (3 credits)

This course concentrates on the historical development of sociological theory with special reference to its European origins. It will also provide a comparative study and critique of various theoretical accounts on the rise and of the transformations of modern society in the 19th and 20th centuries. Selected topics include the individual, society, and polity; economy, class, and status; organization and ideology; religion and society; moral and instrumental action. Prerequisite: SOCL 1020.

SOCL 4880 - Senior Seminar (3 credits)

Students will analyze and integrate information from a variety of sub-disciplines within sociology. Topics may include, but are not limited to, sociological perspectives on race/ethnicity, gender, environment, religion, medicine, deviance, sexuality, and family. Each seminar will have a focal theme that will require students to develop and use their sociological imagination, as well as apply knowledge from prior courses and experiences. This course is presented as a capstone experience, therefore students with advanced standing within the sociology major will benefit the most from the seminar. Prerequisites: SOCL 3000 or SOCL 3200.

Ethical/Moral Issues
Select 3 credits from the following courses:

PHIL 2000 - Moral Issues (3 credits)

This course provides an introduction to moral reasoning through a philosophical examination of important ethical concepts, such as ethical theory, relativism, egoism, and virtue. Topical moral problems such as world hunger, abortion, and animal rights (among others) will be used as illustrative examples. Students will be introduced to the idea that ethical problems are largely a matter of reason and that progress toward solutions can be gained through an application of normative ethical (philosophical) theory. Prerequisite: COMP 1500 or COMP 1500H. 

PHIL 3010 - Ethical Issues in Communication (3 credits)

This course provides an introduction to moral reasoning through a philosophical examination of major ethical problems in communications, such as those encountered by media professionals; conflicts of interest, morally offensive content, media influences on anti-social behavior, confidential sources, privacy, truth and honesty in reporting, among others. Student will be introduced to the idea that ethical problems are largely a matter of normative ethical (philosophical) theory. Prerequisite: COMP 2000, COMP 2010, or COMP 2020 or COMP 2000H. 

PHIL 3180 - Biomedical Ethics (3 credits) OR PHIL 3180H - Biomedical Ethics Honors (3 credits)

PHIL 3180 - Biomedical Ethics (3 credits)

This course provides an introduction to moral reasoning through a philosophical examination of major problems in biomedical ethics, such as abortion, euthanasia, allocation of resources, medical experimentation, genetic engineering, confidentiality, among others. Students will be introduced to the idea that ethical problems are largely a matter of reason; that progress toward solutions can be gained through an application of normative ethical (philosophical) theory. Prerequisite: COMP 2000, COMP 2010 or COMP 2020 or COMP 2000H. 

PHIL 3180H - Biomedical Ethics Honors (3 credits)

This course provides an introduction to moral reasoning through a philosophical examination of major problems in biomedical ethics, such as abortion, euthanasia, allocation of resources, medical experimentation, genetic engineering, confidentiality, among others. Students will be introduced to the idea that ethical problems are largely a matter of reason, that progress toward solutions can be gained through an application of normative ethical (philosophical) theory. Prerequisite: COMP 2000, COMP 2010, or COMP 2020 or COMP 2000H.

PHIL 3200 - Ethics and Sport (3 credits)

This course provides an introduction to moral reasoning through a philosophical examination of major problems in sports, such as the nature of sportsmanship, drugs, violence, commercialization, and gender equality, among others. Students will be introduced to the idea that ethical problems are largely a matter of reason; that progress toward solutions can be gained through an application of normative ethical (philosophical) theory. Prerequisite: COMP 2000, COMP 2010 or COMP 2020 or COMP 2000H. 

PHIL 3360 - Environmental Ethics (3 credits)

This course provides an introduction to moral reasoning through the philosophical examination of major problems in environmental ethics, such as the relationship between human beings and living and non-living environments, controlling nature, and land use, assessing risk, responsibility to future generations, and the role of science, among others. Students will be introduced to the idea that ethical problems are largely a matter of reason; that progress toward solutions can be gained through an application of normative ethical (philosophical) theory. Prerequisite: COMP 2000, COMP 2010, or COMP 2020 or COMP 2000H.

Select 21 credits from any non-core SOCL courses. At least 12 of these credits must be at the 3000/4000 level.

The academic program and curriculum requirements listed on this page are from the NSU Undergraduate Student Catalog. Students are bound by policies and curricula published in the catalog in effect the semester they enter the university, unless an agreement is made with appropriate NSU administration officials allowing them to abide by policies published in a later catalog.

View sample 4-Year Academic Plan

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