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Curriculum

The Applied Professional Studies major is available only to students enrolled in the Career Development Program. It offers a flexible program for adults who have gained significant professional experience and/or who have earned a large number of college credits toward their particular career goal. It is designed to allow students to select courses that best fit their career plans. Rather than study in one discipline or area of focus, students focus on applied practical studies that often draw on subjects in two or more divisions. The APS major may be offered to students in all locations subject to course availability. Acceptance into this major is determined by the appropriate division director.

Learning Outcomes

A successful applied professional studies graduate is expected to:

  1. Explain the integration of information from both concentrations;
  2. Identify the fundamental theories and principles underlying concentration II;
  3. Demonstrate a comprehensive understanding of the fundamental theories and principles underlying concentration II.

Curriculum Requirements

A minimum of 30 upper division (3000 and higher) credits must be included in the total required 120 credits. Students may apply an unlimited number of prior learning credits toward their applied professional studies degree; a minimum of 30 credits must be completed at NSU. Students majoring in applied professional studies may demonstrate learning competencies for one of their concentrations through NSU coursework, transfer courses from other institutions, prior learning, or testing (e.g., DANTES and CLEP). Specific requirements are:

  • General Education Framework: 30 credits
  • Major Requirements:
    • Concentration I (18 credits prior to entering the major)
    • Concentration II (number of credits depends on the concentration)
  • Open Electives 33-48 credits (depending on the concentration)

Total Degree Requirements: 120 credits

General Education Requirements (30 credits)

Students are required to complete 30 credit hours as part of the General Education Program. For specific course requirements, refer to the General Education Program section in the Academic Resources and Procedures segment of the Undergraduate Student Catalog.

Concentrations

Students choose one of the following concentrations after consultation with their academic advisor. Not all concentrations are offered at every location.

Program Requirements (8 credits)
Select 8 credits from the following courses:

BIOL 1500 - Biology I/Lab (4 credits)

An introduction to the biological sciences for students interested in pursuing a career in this area. Includes subcellular and cellular organization, structures/function, biochemistry, classical/molecular genetics, and population dynamics - all arranged around evolution as a major theme. Includes laboratory sessions. Prerequisites: MATH 1040 or higher and COMP 1000 or higher.

BIOL 1510 - Biology II/Lab (4 credits) OR BIOL 1510H - Biology II/Lab Honors (4 credits)

BIOL 1510 - Biology II/Lab (4 credits)

This course and related labs, the second part of a two-part sequence, introduces the basic principles of biological science at the level of the organism and above. It focuses on a survey of the five kingdoms and compares the structure and function of organ systems in plants and animals. It includes the study of evolution, phylogenetic relationships, species diversity and ecological interactions. Prerequisites: BIOL 1500 and MATH 1040 or higher and COMP 1000 or higher. 

BIOL 1510H - Biology II/Lab Honors (4 credits)

This course and related labs, the second part of a two-part sequence, introduces the basic principles of biological science at the level of the organism and above. It focuses on a survey of the five kingdoms and compares the structure and function of organ systems in plants and animals. It includes the study of evolution, phylogenetic relationships, species diversity and ecological interactions. Prerequisites: BIOL 1500 and MATH 1040 or higher and COMP 1000 or higher. Honors students only. 

CHEM 1300 - General Chemistry I/Lab (4 credits) OR CHEM 1300H - General Chemistry I/Lab Honors (4 credits)

CHEM 1300 - General Chemistry I/Lab (4 credits)

This course and the related lab is the first part of a two-semester sequence that studies the laws, principles and theories of atomic structure, molecular structure and bonding, stoichiometry, states of matter/solutions, energetics, oxidation reduction, and laboratory chemistry, including their applications. Prerequisite: MATH 1200. 

CHEM 1300H - General Chemistry I/Lab Honors (4 credits)

This course and the related lab is the first part of a two-semester sequence that studies the laws, principles and theories of atomic structure, molecular structure and bonding, stoichiometry, states of matter/solutions, energetics, oxidation reduction, and laboratory chemistry, including their applications. Prerequisites: MATH 1200; Honors students only.

CHEM 1310 - General Chemistry II/Lab (4 credits) OR CHEM 1310H - General Chemistry II/Lab Honors (4 credits)

CHEM 1310 - General Chemistry II/Lab (4 credits)

This course and the related lab is the second part of a two-semester sequence that studies atomic structure, molecular structure and bonding, states of matter/solutions, dynamics (kinetics and thermodynamics), equilibrium, electrochemistry, and laboratory chemistry including their applications. Prerequisite: CHEM 1300 OR CHEM 1300H. 

CHEM 1310H - General Chemistry II/Lab Honors (4 credits)

This course and the related lab is the second part of a two-semester sequence that studies atomic structure, molecular structure and bonding, states of matter/solutions, dynamics (kinetics and thermodynamics), equilibrium, electrochemistry, and laboratory chemistry including their applications. Prerequisite: CHEM 1300 or CHEM 1300H.

Core Course (3 credits)

BIOL 4901 - APS Capstone Course in Biological and Physical Sciences (3 credits)

This course is reserved for students who are enrolled in the Applied Professional Studies Program. Through a series of written assignments, this course provides students with an opportunity to integrate previous learning and experience with a concentration in biological or physical sciences to form a unique course of academic study. Given that the APS major is individualized to a large extent based on a student's interests and past experiences, this course ordinarily will be conducted as an independent study and will be taken during the student's last semester prior to receipt of their degree. Prerequisite: To be determined by supervising faculty and the department chair.

Major Electives (24-28 credits)
Select seven 2000 or higher level courses. Three courses must be at the 3000-level or higher. At least three of the courses must be courses that include laboratory. This selection is from the following prefixes: BIOL, CHEM, PHYS, MBIO, ENVS, SCIE.

The APS degree with a concentration in pre-optometry studies is available only to admitted students in the Pre-Optometry Program offered by the College of Optometry. To complete this bachelor’s degree program, students must complete the pre-optometry studies concentration along with a course in mathematics (MATH 1030, MATH 1040, MATH 1200, or MATH 1250) and a communications course (SPCH 1010, SPCH 3120, WRIT 3150, or WRIT 3160) to total 32.5 credits at NSU. OPT and OPTC courses can be viewed in the catalog of the College of Optometry.

Core Courses (25.5 credits)

BIOL 4901 - APS Capstone Course in Biological and Physical Sciences (3 credits)

This course is reserved for students who are enrolled in the Applied Professional Studies Program. Through a series of written assignments, this course provides students with an opportunity to integrate previous learning and experience with a concentration in biological or physical sciences to form a unique course of academic study. Given that the APS major is individualized to a large extent based on a student's interests and past experiences, this course ordinarily will be conducted as an independent study and will be taken during the student's last semester prior to receipt of their degree. Prerequisite: To be determined by supervising faculty and the department chair. 

OPT 1011 - Histology and Embryology (1 credit)

General principles of human histology and embryology with details histologic view of each tissue of the body.

OPT 1233 - Biochemistry (3 credits)

Biochemistry of metabolic pathways; visual, digestive, muscular, respiratory, endocrine systems. Protein structure and chemistry, lipids, nucleic acids, carbohydrates, more complex molecules. Clinical correlations illustrates the basic biochemical mechanicisms. 

OPT 1323 - Microbiology (3 credits)

Immunology, bacteriology, mycology, parasitology, virology. Underlying systematics and genetics of parasites, host- parasite interactions. Etiology, demography and clinical characteristics of disease manifestations that an optometrist may encounter. 

OPT 2422 - Ocular Anatomy (3 credits)

The composing elements of the globe and orbit are described in detail, with particular attention to their relatively spatial positions. The embryological development of such a complex system is also explained.

OPTC 1134 - Gross Anatomy/Head and Neck (4 credits)

Presentation of human body structure. Discusses each body system from a cellular, tissue and organ perspective. Detailed examination of head and neck regions of the body. Intensive laboratory work studying prosected cadaver material.

OPTC 2023 - General Neuroanatomy (2.5 credits)

This course will examine the structural, functional, and developmental features of the human nervous system with reference to different disease states. 

OPTC 2144 - General Physiology (4 credits)

The purpose of this course is to provide the student with an understanding of various factors and processes responsible for the development, progression, and procreation of life. The material of the course will be presented in accordance with an organ systems approach with particular emphasis on applications of the discussed principles to the specific clinical examples and disorders that affect eyes and vision. The areas covered will include cellular physiology, skeletal and smooth muscle, the cardiovascular system, the nervous and sensory systems, the renal system, the respiratory system, the gastrointestinal system, and the endocrine system. 

PHYS 3300 - Fundamentals of Optics (3 credits)

This is an introductory optics course that covers the fundamental principles of geometrical and physical optics with some emphasis on the optics of vision. It also serves as an introduction for students of optometry and related sciences. This course has been exempted from the requirements of the Writing Across the Curriculum policy. Prerequisites: PHYS 2350 or higher and MATH 2100 or MATH 2100H. 

Major Prerequisites (or equivalents) (9 credits)

MATH 2020 - Applied Statistics (3 credits)

This course is an introductory course in the use of descriptive and inferential statistics. Topics include graphical and numerical descriptive measures, probability, common random variables and their distributions including the binomial and normal distributions, the Central Limit Theorem, sampling procedures, confidence intervals, and hypothesis testing. This course has been exempted from the requirements of the Writing Across the Curriculum policy. Prerequisite: MATH 1040 or higher. 

MATH 2020H - Applied Statistics Honors (3 credits)

This course is an introductory course in the use of descriptive and inferential statistics. Topics include graphical and numerical descriptive measures, probability, common random variables and their distributions including the binomial and normal distributions, the Central Limit Theorem, sampling procedures, confidence intervals, and hypothesis testing. This course has been exempted from the requirements of the Writing Across the Curriculum policy. Prerequisite: MATH 1040 or higher; Honors students only. 

PSYC 1020 - Introduction to Psychology (3 credits)

An introduction to theory, research, and applications in the field of psychology. Topics include biological bases of behavior, perception, learning and memory, psychological development, personality, social psychology, and the identification and treatment of mental illness.

PSYC 2900 - Quantitative Psychology (3 credits)

This course is an introduction to the quantitative methods employed by psychologists and other social scientists to answer their empirical questions. You will learn both descriptive and inferential statistics during the semester. After you have taken this course, you should be better able to understand and interpret the results sections of articles in scientific journals. You will understand, for example, what it means to say that two groups have different levels of anxiety at a statistically significant level, and what calculations are involved in drawing such a conclusion. As another example, you should come away from this class with a good understanding of what it means (and, importantly, what it does not mean) to say that crime rates and ice cream sales are positively correlated. Prerequisites: MATH 2020 or MATH 2020H or MATH 3020 or MATH 3020H and PSYC 1020 or PSYC 1020H. 

Core Courses (24 credits)

PSYC 2100 - Biological Bases of Behavior (3 credits)

This course provides a survey of genetic, neural, and endocrine bases of behavior. Focus topics include brain neuroanatomy, neural communication, sensory processes, motivation, emotion, and arousal. Prerequisite: PSYC 1020 or PSYC 1020H.

PSYC 2350 - Life-Span Human Development (3 credits)

This course is designed to provide the student with an understanding of systematic changes within the individual from conception through death. Unlike many studies of development, this course is structured around issues of development rather than examination of development from a chronological perspective. This structure will allow the student to more completely grasp life-span issues. Family, social roles, lifestyle, psychological disorders, mental abilities, and death and dying will be examined. Prerequisite: PSYC 1020 or PSYC 1020H.

PSYC 3210 - Personality (3 credits)

Survey of psychoanalytic, humanistic, cognitive, and behavioral theories of personality. Current issues and personality research. Prerequisites: PSYC 1020 or 1020H. 

PSYC 3520 - Principles of Learning (3 credits)

Principles of Learning examines theories and research concerning the basic principles and concepts of learning. Theories of classical and operant conditioning will be explored, in addition to selected theories which explore the interaction between learning, memory and motivation. Additionally, basic neuroanatomy and neurochemistry underlying various learning processes will also be introduced. Prerequisite: PSYC 1020 or 1020H.

PSYC 4901 - APS Capstone Course in Psychology/Substance Abuse Studies (3 credits)

APS Capstone Course in Psychology/Substance Abuse Studies: This course is reserved for students who are enrolled in the Applied Professional Studies Program. Through a series of written assignments, this course provides students with an opportunity to integrate previous learning and experience with a concentration in either psychology or substance abuse studies to form a unique course of academic study. Given that the APS major is individualized to a large extent based on a student's interests and past experiences, this course ordinarily will be conducted as an independent study and will be taken during the student's last semester prior to receipt of their degree. Prerequisite: written consent from department chair.

One 3000/4000-level PSYC course, selected with assistance from academic advisor (3 credits)

The academic program and curriculum requirements listed on this page are from the NSU Undergraduate Student Catalog. Students are bound by policies and curricula published in the catalog in effect the semester they enter the university, unless an agreement is made with appropriate NSU administration officials allowing them to abide by policies published in a later catalog.

View sample 4-Year Academic Plan

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