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Curriculum

The Applied Professional Studies major is available only to students enrolled in the Career Development Program. It offers a flexible program for adults who have gained significant professional experience and/or who have earned a large number of college credits toward their particular career goal. It is designed to allow students to select courses that best fit their career plans. Rather than study in one discipline or area of focus, students focus on applied practical studies that often draw on subjects in two or more divisions. The APS major may be offered to students in all locations subject to course availability. Acceptance into this major is determined by the appropriate division director.

Learning Outcomes

A successful applied professional studies graduate is expected to:

  1. Analyze, integrate, and synthesize information from both concentrations and demonstrate the relationship of the information toward a career;
  2. Demonstrate:
    1. The ability to articulate critically the fundamental theories and principles underlying concentration II;
    2. The ability to articulate critically the relationship of the theories and principles of concentration II to concentration I (where appropriate);
    3. The ways in which the theories and principles of concentration II are operationalized in practice, and;
    4. Preparation for scholarly pursuit;
  3. Communicate the knowledge, skills, and principles acquired through the major in an organized, concise, and grammatically correct form.

Curriculum Requirements

A minimum of 30 upper division (3000 and higher) credits must be included in the total required 120 credits. Students may apply an unlimited number of prior learning credits toward their applied professional studies degree; a minimum of 30 credits must be completed at NSU. Students majoring in applied professional studies may demonstrate learning competencies for one of their concentrations through NSU coursework, transfer courses from other institutions, prior learning, or testing (e.g., DANTES and CLEP). Specific requirements are:

  • General Education Framework: 30 credits
  • Major Requirements:
    • Concentration I (18 credits prior to entering the major)
    • Concentration II (number of credits depends on the concentration)
  • Open Electives 33-48 credits (depending on the concentration)

Total Degree Requirements: 120 credits

General Education Requirements (30 credits)

Students are required to complete 30 credit hours as part of the General Education Program. For specific course requirements, refer to the General Education Program section in the Academic Resources and Procedures segment of the Undergraduate Student Catalog.

Concentrations

Students choose one of the following concentrations after consultation with their academic advisor. Not all concentrations are offered at every location.

Program Requirements (8 credits)
Select 8 credits from the following courses:

BIOL 1500 - Biology I/Lab (4 credits)

An introduction to the biological sciences for students interested in pursuing a career in this area. Includes subcellular and cellular organization, structures/function, biochemistry, classical/molecular genetics, and population dynamics - all arranged around evolution as a major theme. Includes laboratory sessions. Prerequisites: MATH 1040 or higher and COMP 1000 or higher.

BIOL 1510 - Biology II/Lab (4 credits) OR BIOL 1510H - Biology II/Lab Honors (4 credits)

BIOL 1510 - Biology II/Lab (4 credits)

This course and related labs, the second part of a two-part sequence, introduces the basic principles of biological science at the level of the organism and above. It focuses on a survey of the five kingdoms and compares the structure and function of organ systems in plants and animals. It includes the study of evolution, phylogenetic relationships, species diversity and ecological interactions. Prerequisites: BIOL 1500 and MATH 1040 or higher and COMP 1000 or higher. 

BIOL 1510H - Biology II/Lab Honors (4 credits)

This course and related labs, the second part of a two-part sequence, introduces the basic principles of biological science at the level of the organism and above. It focuses on a survey of the five kingdoms and compares the structure and function of organ systems in plants and animals. It includes the study of evolution, phylogenetic relationships, species diversity and ecological interactions. Prerequisites: BIOL 1500 and MATH 1040 or higher and COMP 1000 or higher. Honors students only. 

CHEM 1300 - General Chemistry I/Lab (4 credits) OR CHEM 1300H - General Chemistry I/Lab Honors (4 credits)

CHEM 1300 - General Chemistry I/Lab (4 credits)

This course and the related lab is the first part of a two-semester sequence that studies the laws, principles and theories of atomic structure, molecular structure and bonding, stoichiometry, states of matter/solutions, energetics, oxidation reduction, and laboratory chemistry, including their applications. Prerequisite: MATH 1200. 

CHEM 1300H - General Chemistry I/Lab Honors (4 credits)

This course and the related lab is the first part of a two-semester sequence that studies the laws, principles and theories of atomic structure, molecular structure and bonding, stoichiometry, states of matter/solutions, energetics, oxidation reduction, and laboratory chemistry, including their applications. Prerequisites: MATH 1200; Honors students only.

CHEM 1310 - General Chemistry II/Lab (4 credits) OR CHEM 1310H - General Chemistry II/Lab Honors (4 credits)

CHEM 1310 - General Chemistry II/Lab (4 credits)

This course and the related lab is the second part of a two-semester sequence that studies atomic structure, molecular structure and bonding, states of matter/solutions, dynamics (kinetics and thermodynamics), equilibrium, electrochemistry, and laboratory chemistry including their applications. Prerequisite: CHEM 1300 OR CHEM 1300H. 

CHEM 1310H - General Chemistry II/Lab Honors (4 credits)

This course and the related lab is the second part of a two-semester sequence that studies atomic structure, molecular structure and bonding, states of matter/solutions, dynamics (kinetics and thermodynamics), equilibrium, electrochemistry, and laboratory chemistry including their applications. Prerequisite: CHEM 1300 or CHEM 1300H.

Core Course (3 credits)

BIOL 4901 - APS Capstone Course in Biological and Physical Sciences (3 credits)

This course is reserved for students who are enrolled in the Applied Professional Studies Program. Through a series of written assignments, this course provides students with an opportunity to integrate previous learning and experience with a concentration in biological or physical sciences to form a unique course of academic study. Given that the APS major is individualized to a large extent based on a student's interests and past experiences, this course ordinarily will be conducted as an independent study and will be taken during the student's last semester prior to receipt of their degree. Prerequisite: To be determined by supervising faculty and the department chair.

Major Electives (24-28 credits)
Select seven 2000 or higher level courses. Three courses must be at the 3000-level or higher. At least three of the courses must be courses that include laboratory. This selection is from the following prefixes: BIOL, CHEM, PHYS, MBIO, ENVS, SCIE.

Major Prerequisites (or equivalents) (6 credits)

MATH 1200 - Precalculus Algebra (3 credits)

This course is for students with a strong background in algebra. Students will study fundamental concepts of algebra; equations and inequalities; functions and graphs; polynomials; and rational, exponential, and logarithmic functions. This course has been exempted from the requirements of the Writing Across the Curriculum policy. Prerequisite: Challenge examination or MATH 1040. 

TECH 1110 - Technology in Information Age (3 credits)

In this course, students work for mastery of basic computer application skills in file management, word processing, spreadsheet, charting, database, Internet research, and web authoring/publishing. In addition, students acquire a deeper understanding of technology as used by professionals in all information technology fields, current trends, ethical use of technology, and technology management. A challenge exam (passing score = 75 percent) is available for those students who believe they already possess these skills.

Core Courses (26–27 credits)

CSIS 1800 - Introduction to Computer and Information Sciences (3 credits)

An introductory course to study computer systems layer by layer.  The material covers Information Layer, Hardware Layer, Programming Layer, Operating Systems Layer, Application Layer, and Communication Layer.  Each layer is covered in great detail and the concepts are supplemented by real examples. 

CSIS 2000 - Introduction to Database Systems (3 credits)

This course will give students an introduction to the structured query language (SQL). The course introduces relational, object-oriented, distributed, and multimedia database systems. This course covers concepts and tools necessary to analyze a business scenario, then design and implement a database system that is in 3rd Normal Form. Students will build, populate, query, and write transactions for a relational database. The students also learn how to interface Web based data access via database connection using modern languages and tools. Prerequisite: CSIS 1800 or TECH 1800. 

CSIS 2050 - Discrete Mathematics (3 credits)

An introduction to the concepts and techniques of discrete mathematical structures that are used in the theory and application of computer science and computer information systems. Topics covered include set theory, relations, functions, proof techniques, predicate logic, combinational and sequential logic and circuitry, recurrence relations, boolean algebra, graph theory, trees, and discrete probability. Prerequisite: MATH 1200.

CSIS 2101 - Fundamentals of Computer Programming (4 credits)

This course provides an introduction to computer programming using a modern programming language. Major topics to be covered are: syntax, expressions, variables and data types, blocks and scope, input/output and file handling, conditional selection statements, loops and iteration statements, functions, pointers and arrays, classes, inheritance, and aggregation, all through program development. Prerequisite: MATH 1040.

CSIS 3101 - Advanced Computer Programming (4 credits)

The course addresses advanced programming concepts that are specific to generic programming languages that require understanding of how data and objects are represented in memory. Pointers, overriding of data types and operators, dynamic memory allocation and management, reliable and secure programming issues and templates are discussed. Illustration of difference between structured programming and object oriented programming are discussed by examples. Prerequisites: CSIS 2101 or CSIS 2100. 

CSIS 4901 - APS Capstone Directed Independent Study (3 credits)

This course is reserved for students who are enrolled in the Applied Professional Studies Program. Through a series of written assignments, this course provides students with an opportunity to integrate previous learning and experience with a concentration in computing field to form a unique course of academic study. Given that the APS major is individualized to a large extent based on a student's interests and past experiences, this course ordinarily will be conducted as an independent study and will be taken during the student's last semester prior to receipt of their degree. Prerequisite: to be determined by supervising faculty and the department chair

Select 6-7 credits from the following courses:

CSIS 3020 - Web Programming and Design (3 credits)

This course will introduce the essentials of Internet programming. Students will design and write WWW pages in HTML, JavaScript, and shell scripting languages. Programs will manipulate many forms of data, including hypertext, graphics, audio, and video. Students will develop interactive/executable Web pages. Other topics covered will include clickable image maps, cgi-bin scripting, and security. Prerequisite: CSIS 2100 or CSIS 2101. 

CSIS 3500 - Network and Data Communication (3 credits)

This course provides an introduction to basic data communications and how the Internet and World Wide Web work. It develops the fundamentals essential to understand wired and wireless network topologies, connection-oriented and connection-less protocols, and routing. Students develop an understanding of how protocols are layered and the concepts of services available at each layer, as well as, how errors affect communication and various mechanisms to mitigate the errors. They will also learn how to appropriately apply various reliable and unreliable protocol based services to various high-level applications including text, data, images, speech, and video streams for both real-time and non-real-time communications. The course will introduce security related issues. It places specific emphasis on the TCP/IP protocol stack and the protocols that are currently critical. Prerequisites: CSIS 1800 or TECH 1800 and MATH 1040.

CSIS 3750 - Software Engineering (4 credits)

An introduction to the process of developing software systems. Topics include software life-cycle models, quality factors, requirements analysis and specification, software design (functional design and object-oriented design), implementation, testing, and management of large software projects. Prerequisite: CSIS 3460 or CSIS 3100.

CSIS 4890 - Special Topics in Computer Information Systems (3 credits)

Topics in computer information systems that are not included in regular course offerings. Specific contents are announced in the course schedule for a given term. Prerequisite: requires senior standing or consent of instructor. 

Core Courses (24 credits)

CSIS 3023 - Legal and Ethical Aspects of Computers (3 credits)

This course focuses on issues that involve computer impact and related societal concerns. Topics covered include computer ethics, computer crime, software ownership, privacy risk management, professional codes, transborder data flow, Telecommunications Act of 1996, the national computer policies of other nations, and the status of regulation and emerging standards. 

TECH 1110 - Technology in Information Age (3 credits)

In this course, students work for mastery of basic computer application skills in file management, word processing, spreadsheet, charting, database, Internet research, and web authoring/publishing. In addition, students acquire a deeper understanding of technology as used by professionals in all information technology fields, current trends, ethical use of technology, and technology management.

TECH 2150 - Introduction to Internet Resources (3 credits)

In this course, students will discover and explore the internet and a multitude of its resources. Students will examine fundamental concepts and terminology of the Internet, explore a host of multimedia applications used through the Internet, and learn different skills for searching the Web and getting more out of the Internet. Specifically, the course will allow students to briefly examine the history of the Internet, explore its architecture, and become knowledgeable on some of its applications such as the Web, Email and File Transfer Protocol (FTP). Students will develop the skills necessary for searching precise Internet content and then critically assessing these findings for value and credibility. Students will also learn about Internet technologies and security, and learn about e-business models. Finally, it will introduce students to design principles for developing usable and accessible Web sites, and allow students to employ tools on how to improve page ranking. Prerequisite: TECH 1110 or TECH 1111 or the Challenge Exam.

TECH 4901 - APS Capstone Course in Information Technology (3 credits)

This course is reserved for students who are enrolled in the Applied Professional Studies Program. Through a series of written assignments, this course provides students with an opportunity to integrate previous learning and experience with a concentration in information science to form a unique course of academic study. Given that the APS major is individualized to a large extent based on a student's interests and past experiences, this course ordinarily will be conducted as an independent study and will be taken during the student's last semester prior to receipt of their degree. Prerequisite: to be determined by supervising faculty and the department chair.

Select 12 credits from the following courses:

CSIS 3500 - Network and Data Communication (3 credits)

This course provides an introduction to basic data communications and how the Internet and World Wide Web work. It develops the fundamentals essential to understand wired and wireless network topologies, connection-oriented and connection-less protocols, and routing. Students develop an understanding of how protocols are layered and the concepts of services available at each layer, as well as, how errors affect communication and various mechanisms to mitigate the errors. They will also learn how to appropriately apply various reliable and unreliable protocol based services to various high-level applications including text, data, images, speech, and video streams for both real-time and non-real-time communications. The course will introduce security related issues. It places specific emphasis on the TCP/IP protocol stack and the protocols that are currently critical. Prerequisites: CSIS 1800 or TECH 1800 and MATH 1040. 

PHIL 3010 - Ethical Issues in Communication (3 credits)

This course provides an introduction to moral reasoning through a philosophical examination of major ethical problems in communications, such as those encountered by media professionals; conflicts of interest, morally offensive content, media influences on anti-social behavior, confidential sources, privacy, truth and honesty in reporting, among others. Student will be introduced to the idea that ethical problems are largely a matter of normative ethical (philosophical) theory. Prerequisite: COMP 2000, COMP 2010, or COMP 2020 or COMP 2000H. 

TECH 2130 - Business Applications of Microcomputers (3 credits)

This course covers the fundamental theories and applications of business programs for microcomputers that are useful in the small- to mid-size business environment. Accounting, relational database management, and information system management programs will be included. This is a computer laboratory course. Prerequisite: TECH 1110 or TECH 1111.

TECH 3000 - Multimedia Design (3 credits)

This course offers students literacy in the basic principles of 2-dimension digital multimedia. Students will explore a variety of software applications to create projects and presentations in multiple interfaces including digital photos, animations, sound, video, color and typography, visual culture management, and time-based art. Students will discuss multimedia frontiers, emerging technology, and societal issues including human impact, regulation, copyright, fair use, equity, cost, and universal access. Students should have a working knowledge (point-and-shoot and file transfer) of and access to their own digital cameras, camcorders, microphones, etc. Prerequisite: TECH 1800 or CSIS 1800. 

TECH 3010 - Principles of Web Site Design (3 credits)

This course gives students an in-depth understanding of web design techniques, principles and skills for navigation, functional/visual design, digital media incorporation and content development, and includes the ongoing process of web site management. Students gain technical proficiency in programming with HTML, Cascading Style Sheets and JavaScript, and File Transfer Protocol (FTP) to plan, create, publish and maintain interactive web pages. Projects will focus on effective site structure, page design, consistent layout, internationalization, and the incorporation of forms, images, video, and sound. Prerequisite: TECH 3000. 

The APS degree with a concentration in pre-optometry studies is only available to admitted students in the Pre-Optometry Program offered by the College of Optometry. To complete this bachelor's degree program, students must complete the pre-optometry studies concentration along with a course in mathematics (MATH 1030, MATH 1040, MATH 1200, or MATH 1250) and a communications course (SPCH 1010, SPCH 3120, WRIT 3150, or WRIT 3160) to total 32.5 credits at NSU. OPT and OPTC courses can be viewed in the catalog of the College of Optometry.

Core Courses (26.5 credits)

BIOL 4901 - APS Capstone Course in Biological and Physical Sciences (3 credits)

This course is reserved for students who are enrolled in the Applied Professional Studies Program. Through a series of written assignments, this course provides students with an opportunity to integrate previous learning and experience with a concentration in biological or physical sciences to form a unique course of academic study. Given that the APS major is individualized to a large extent based on a student's interests and past experiences, this course ordinarily will be conducted as an independent study and will be taken during the student's last semester prior to receipt of their degree. Prerequisite: To be determined by supervising faculty and the department chair. 

OPT 1011 - Histology and Embryology (1 credit)

General principles of human histology and embryology with details histologic view of each tissue of the body.

OPT 1233 - Biochemistry (3 credits)

Biochemistry of metabolic pathways; visual, digestive, muscular, respiratory, endocrine systems. Protein structure and chemistry, lipids, nucleic acids, carbohydrates, more complex molecules. Clinical correlations illustrates the basic biochemical mechanicisms. 

OPT 1323 - Microbiology (3 credits)

Immunology, bacteriology, mycology, parasitology, virology. Underlying systematics and genetics of parasites, host- parasite interactions. Etiology, demography and clinical characteristics of disease manifestations that an optometrist may encounter. 

OPT 2422 - Ocular Anatomy (3 credits)

The composing elements of the globe and orbit are described in detail, with particular attention to their relatively spatial positions. The embryological development of such a complex system is also explained.

OPTC 1134 - Gross Anatomy/Head and Neck (4 credits)

Presentation of human body structure. Discusses each body system from a cellular, tissue and organ perspective. Detailed examination of head and neck regions of the body. Intensive laboratory work studying prosected cadaver material.

OPTC 2023 - General Neuroanatomy (2.5 credits)

This course will examine the structural, functional, and developmental features of the human nervous system with reference to different disease states. 

OPTC 2144 - General Physiology (4 credits)

The purpose of this course is to provide the student with an understanding of various factors and processes responsible for the development, progression, and procreation of life. The material of the course will be presented in accordance with an organ systems approach with particular emphasis on applications of the discussed principles to the specific clinical examples and disorders that affect eyes and vision. The areas covered will include cellular physiology, skeletal and smooth muscle, the cardiovascular system, the nervous and sensory systems, the renal system, the respiratory system, the gastrointestinal system, and the endocrine system. 

PHYS 3300 - Fundamentals of Optics (3 credits)

This is an introductory optics course that covers the fundamental principles of geometrical and physical optics with some emphasis on the optics of vision. It also serves as an introduction for students of optometry and related sciences. This course has been exempted from the requirements of the Writing Across the Curriculum policy. Prerequisites: PHYS 2350 or higher and MATH 2100 or MATH 2100H. 

Major Prerequisites (or equivalents) (9 credits)

MATH 2020 - Applied Statistics (3 credits) OR MATH 2020H - Applied Statistics Honors (3 credits)

MATH 2020 - Applied Statistics (3 credits)

This course is an introductory course in the use of descriptive and inferential statistics. Topics include graphical and numerical descriptive measures, probability, common random variables and their distributions including the binomial and normal distributions, the Central Limit Theorem, sampling procedures, confidence intervals, and hypothesis testing. This course has been exempted from the requirements of the Writing Across the Curriculum policy. Prerequisite: MATH 1040 or higher. 

MATH 2020H - Applied Statistics Honors (3 credits)

This course is an introductory course in the use of descriptive and inferential statistics. Topics include graphical and numerical descriptive measures, probability, common random variables and their distributions including the binomial and normal distributions, the Central Limit Theorem, sampling procedures, confidence intervals, and hypothesis testing. This course has been exempted from the requirements of the Writing Across the Curriculum policy. Prerequisite: MATH 1040 or higher; Honors students only. 

PSYC 1020 - Introduction to Psychology (3 credits)

An introduction to theory, research, and applications in the field of psychology. Topics include biological bases of behavior, perception, learning and memory, psychological development, personality, social psychology, and the identification and treatment of mental illness.

PSYC 2900 - Quantitative Psychology (3 credits)

This course is an introduction to the quantitative methods employed by psychologists and other social scientists to answer their empirical questions. You will learn both descriptive and inferential statistics during the semester. After you have taken this course, you should be better able to understand and interpret the results sections of articles in scientific journals. You will understand, for example, what it means to say that two groups have different levels of anxiety at a statistically significant level, and what calculations are involved in drawing such a conclusion. As another example, you should come away from this class with a good understanding of what it means (and, importantly, what it does not mean) to say that crime rates and ice cream sales are positively correlated. Prerequisites: MATH 2020 or MATH 2020H or MATH 3020 or MATH 3020H and PSYC 1020 or PSYC 1020H. 

Core Courses (24 credits)

PSYC 2100 - Biological Bases of Behavior (3 credits)

This course provides a survey of genetic, neural, and endocrine bases of behavior. Focus topics include brain neuroanatomy, neural communication, sensory processes, motivation, emotion, and arousal. Prerequisite: PSYC 1020 or PSYC 1020H.

PSYC 2160 - Social Psychology (3 credits)

This course provides an introduction to the scientific study of how people's thoughts, feelings, and behaviors are influenced by the real or imagined presence of other people. Topics such as self-perception, judgment and decision-making, rationalization, attitude change, conformity, social influence, obedience, attraction, love, aggression, violence, altruism, deception, nonverbal communication, and prejudice will be covered. Prerequisite: PSYC 1020 or PSYC 1020H.

PSYC 2350 - Life-Span Human Development (3 credits)

This course is designed to provide the student with an understanding of systematic changes within the individual from conception through death. Unlike many studies of development, this course is structured around issues of development rather than examination of development from a chronological perspective. This structure will allow the student to more completely grasp life-span issues. Family, social roles, lifestyle, psychological disorders, mental abilities, and death and dying will be examined. Prerequisite: PSYC 1020 or PSYC 1020H. 

PSYC 3000 - Psychological Research Methods (3 credits)

This course covers the methodological tools used in psychological research studies, with specific emphasis on observational, correlational, experimental, and quasi-experimental designs. Students will develop testable hypotheses, design a quantitative experimental research study, and use APA-format to write a report similar to those found in professional psychological journals. Prerequisites: PSYC 2900.

PSYC 3210 - Personality (3 credits) OR PSYC 3260 - Abnormal Psychology (3 credits)

PSYC 3210 - Personality (3 credits)

Survey of psychoanalytic, humanistic, cognitive, and behavioral theories of personality. Current issues and personality research. Prerequisites: PSYC 1020 or 1020H. 

PSYC 3260 - Abnormal Psychology (3 credits)

Diagnoses, causes, and prognoses for the various categories of psychological disorders. Case studies supplement and illustrate theory and research. Prerequisite: PSYC 1020 or 1020H. 

PSYC 3520 - Principles of Learning (3 credits)

Principles of Learning examines theories and research concerning the basic principles and concepts of learning. Theories of classical and operant conditioning will be explored, in addition to selected theories which explore the interaction between learning, memory and motivation. Additionally, basic neuroanatomy and neurochemistry underlying various learning processes will also be introduced. Prerequisite: PSYC 1020 or 1020H.

PSYC 4901 - APS Capstone Course in Psychology/Substance Abuse Studies (3 credits)

APS Capstone Course in Psychology/Substance Abuse Studies: This course is reserved for students who are enrolled in the Applied Professional Studies Program. Through a series of written assignments, this course provides students with an opportunity to integrate previous learning and experience with a concentration in either psychology or substance abuse studies to form a unique course of academic study. Given that the APS major is individualized to a large extent based on a student's interests and past experiences, this course ordinarily will be conducted as an independent study and will be taken during the student's last semester prior to receipt of their degree. Prerequisite: written consent from department chair.

One 3000/4000-level PSYC course, selected with assistance from academic advisor (3 credits)

The academic program and curriculum requirements listed on this page are from the NSU Undergraduate Student Catalog. Students are bound by policies and curricula published in the catalog in effect the semester they enter the university, unless an agreement is made with appropriate NSU administration officials allowing them to abide by policies published in a later catalog.

View sample 4-Year Academic Plan

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